Monthly Archives: May 2020

Adrienne’s OLLI – Online Learning Lesson Idea #7: Exploring Feelings – KEEP IT-CALM IT-COURAGE IT

Thank you for the positive responses to my weekly OLLI  posts “Online Learning Lesson Ideas“.  I’m happy that you are finding them helpful for your distance lessons.

Here is a list of the previous OLLI lessons and anchor books:

OLLI#1 (The Hike)

OLLI#2. (If I Could Build A School)

OLLIE#3  (Mother’s Day)

OLLI#4 (Everybody Needs a Rock)

OLLI #5(WANTED:  Criminals of the Animal Kingdom) 

OLLI #6 – (Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt)

This is a big week for educators in B.C. as schools open up and, once again, teachers, students, and parents are being asked to navigate a “new normal”.

For the last three months and for likely many more months to come, we have been faced with many “unknowns”.  Unknowns can be accompanied with feelings of fear, sadness, and worry that can, at times, be overwhelming.  There is anticipation and excitement about returning to school but these are mixed with fears and worries about keeping ourselves and our students safe and healthy.  Right now, students, teachers, and parents are all wondering: “What will school look like now?” EVERYONE is going through a roller coaster of emotions that can sometimes leave us feeling overwhelmed.

I think it’s important during these first few days back at school to acknowledge these emotions, name them, share them, and talk about them.  Knowing others are experiencing similar feelings can often help to ease ours.   The most important thing we can do is to tell our students (and ourselves) that its OKAY to be feeling all of these emotions and and that they are not alone.

In addition to noticing and naming feelings, another way we can help students is to talk about actions we can take when we develop certain feelings.  Taking action can help children develop some control over their emotions.

I believe that there are three main different categories of feelings – positive, negative, and anxious – each can be managed with different actions.  Depending on what the feeling you are experiencing, you can “KEEP IT! CALM IT! or COURAGE IT!”

  • KEEP IT: When we experience positive feelings – excitement, joy, love, gratitude, peace – we want to KEEP those inside because they fill our hearts and make us feel good.
  • CALM IT: When we experience negative feelings – anger, hurt, hate, frustration, disappointment – we need to CALM those feelings and practice deep breathing and mindful techniques.
  • COURAGE IT: When we experience anxious feelings – fear, apprehension, nervous, or worried – we need to “COURAGE IT” (poor grammar, I know!) by finding courage to overcome the feelings.

(I actually just made up the “KEEP IT- CALM IT- COURAGE IT” approach to feelings for this post – and I’m kinda diggin’ it!)

My thoughts for this lesson are to share the “KEEP IT! CALM IT! COURAGE IT FEELINGS” concept with children through discussion and… wait for it… ANCHOR BOOKS!    This can be done in three separate lessons in class or invite students to work on it over the week if they are working from home.  Students can complete the template as you move through the three different feelings.

THE LESSON

Start by brainstorming feeling words. Focus on the different kinds of feelings they have been experiencing during the past few months; feelings around having to stay at home, not being with friends or family, not being at school, coming back to school, etc.  (You could likely fill an entire white board with feeling words!) Make sure you are sharing your own feelings with the students as well.  They need to know that you are nervous and worried, too!  Introduce the difference between positive, negative, and anxious feelings.

Next, ask the students, “What do we do with feelings when we experience them?”.  Discuss that sometimes, holding feelings inside can make them grow bigger.  Taking action with our feelings can help us to take control over them and that can sometimes help.  Introduce the “KEEP IT – CALM IT – COURAGE IT” actions (see explanation above)

If you want to extend this idea into several lessons, you can spend one lesson on each of these three different types of feelings.  Each lesson can begin with an anchor book and invitation for students to complete the “KEEP IT! CALM IT! COURAGE IT FEELINGS” template. 

Click HERE for the “KEEP IT-CALM IT-COURAGE IT Feelings template.

Part 1 – KEEP IT – Exploring positive feelings and actions – happy, joyful, thankful, excitement, peace, proud, amazed.

100 Things That Make Me Happy – Amy Schwartz

Love this joyous picture book that lists everyday things that make people happy.  Written in rhyming couplets – great for reading aloud!

Click HERE for the online read aloud.

After students listen to the story, students can share what things make them happy.  Explain that positive experiences create positive feelings that we can keep (in our memory pocket). Brainstorm things that make each student feel happy.  Invite students to complete the first column of the KEEP IT! CALM IT! COURAGE IT! FEELINGS template.

Part 2 – CALM IT – Explore negative feelings and actions: anger, frustration, hurt, disappointment.

Feeling explosions can happen when we experience negative emotions – anger, frustration, disappointment, hurt.  These feelings can fester for a while but can quickly grow too large to hold inside our bodies.  These emotion explosions can be difficult to manage, so helping students recognize that it is okay to have these feelings but teach them strategies to help manage them.  Rather than telling a child to “calm down”, we need to show them how, including tapping into those “KEEP” feelings from the previous lesson.

There are many books illustrating this “explosive” feeling of anger and frusration.  When Sophie Gets Really, Really Angry is one many of us know.  Sometimes I’m Bombaloo is also a great one for illustrating someone who experiences the “anger explosion”.

Sometimes I'm Bombaloo: Vail, Rachel, Heo, Yumi: 9780439669412 ...

Sometimes I’m Bombaloo – Rachel Vail

Click HERE for the online read-aloud.

After students listen to the story below, discuss connections they were making to tempers and not being able to control them sometimes.  Invite students to make connections by sharing things that trigger these explosive feelings.  Ask students what actions they could take to reduce these negative feelings:  deep breathing, thinking of happy memories, opening and closing our fists, etc.

Either of the books below are great ones for showing children some breathing techniques that can help to “CALM IT” when those negative feelings overwhelm us.

My Magic Breath: Finding Calm Through Mindful Breathing: Ortner ...

My Magic Breath – Finding Calm Through Mindful Breathing Nick Ortner

Click HERE for the online Read-Aloud

Alphabreaths – The ABC’s of Mindful Breathing – Christopher Willard

(This is an excellent book with lots of movement and breathing exercises the students could try!)

Invite them to complete the second column of the KEEP IT! CALM IT! COURAGE IT! FEELINGS template.

Part 3 – COURAGE IT! Explore anxious feelings and actions: afraid, nervous, intimidated, uncertain, worried.

If you have students in class this week, they will be likely experiencing some level of anxiety around being back at school.  In fact, during these past few months they have no doubt been feeling various degrees of uncertainty and anxiety about many things, as we all have.  We can help them by letting them know it’s OKAY to be feeling this way and teaching some simple and effective tools on finding courage to deal with stressors in their life.

When You are Brave – Pat Zietlow Miller

This is such a wonderful book for helping students learn to flex their courage muscles!  After reading the story (or listening to online) students can complete the final column of their “KEEP IT-CALM IT-COURAGE IT” Feelings template.

Click HERE for the online read-aloud.

REFLECTION:

Once you have introduced the students to the three different FEELING-ACTIONS and they have completed the template, reflect on what they have learned about feelings.  How has your thinking stretched?  (ie. that feelings can be positive, negative, and anxious; that we can take action with our feelings; that different actions help us have more control over our feelings; that courage can help us feel less anxious, that mindful breathing can help us feel less angry or frustrated; that remembering happy times can make us feel happy)

Simplified Lesson and Additional Anchor Books About Feelings:

For those who would like a simpler lesson, start by brainstorming feeling words. Focus on the different kinds of feelings they have been experiencing during the past few months due to having to stay at home, not being with friends or family, not being at school, coming back to school, etc.  (You could likely fill an entire white board with feeling words!) Make sure you are sharing your own feelings with the students as well.  They need to know that you are nervous and worried, too!  Choose any of the anchor books about feelings to share with your students.  (almost all of them can be found as an online read-aloud)   Identify which feelings are positive, which are negative, and which are anxious.

Primary students can write about their feelings on the My Feelings template HERE

Intermediate students can write about their feelings on the Read-Think-Connect-Reflect template HERE 

Additional Anchor Books About Feelings

(I know there are LOTS of books about feelings but I’ve tried to include ones that you may not already know about.)

Everyone – Christopher Silas Neal

Out, Out, Away From Here – Rachel Woodworth

The Color Monster: A Story About Emotions – Anna Llenas

Tough Guys (Have Feelings Too) – Keith Negley

I’m Worried – Michael Ian Black

Feelings – Libby Walden

All Bout Feelings – Felicity Brooks

Visiting Feelings Lauren Rubenstein

The Great Big Book of Feelings Mary Hoffman

 

Whether you are returning to school to teach students in person or whether you are staying at home to teach students online – I’m sending you CARE and COURAGE as you bravely forge ahead into a week of unknowns.  Thank you for all you are doing, for all the time, work and care you are devoting to your students and for BEING BRAVE through it all.

Have a great week, everyone!  Hope these lessons inspire some ideas for your online or in-person learning this week.  Happy reading and happy gardening!

You are doing an amazing job!  There is a light at the end of this tunnel! You can do it!!!

 

 

 

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Filed under Connect, Emotions, Feelings, OLLI, Online Books and Lessons, Picture Book, Writing Anchor book

Adrienne’s OLLI – Online Learning Lesson Idea #6: Up in Garden and Down in the Dirt – Kate Messner

Hello everyone!  Hope you all had a restful weekend and enjoyed some time with people in “your bubble”.  Things seem to be “opening up” slowly,  with “in person teaching”  scheduled to start next week.  I know that the thought of being back in schools with children brings with it a range of emotion and I am sending you positive thoughts and energy as you transition to yet another version of our “new normal”.

Thank you for the positive responses to my weekly OLLI  posts “Online Learning Lesson Ideas“.  I’m happy that you are finding them helpful for your distance lessons.

Here is a list of the previous OLLI lessons and anchor books:

OLLI#1 (The Hike)

OLLI#2. (If I Could Build A School)

OLLIE#3  (Mother’s Day)

OLLI#4 (Everybody Needs a Rock)

OLLI #5(WANTED:  Criminals of the Animal Kingdom) 

Anchor Book:

Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt | Flowering Minds

Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt – Kate Messner

This week’s OWWI is based on the anchor book Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt by Kate Messner and illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal – the second book in the “Over and Under” series. (See also Over and Under the Snow and Over and Under the Pond)  I love this series and have used them extensively in classrooms.  I particularly love the clever “split screen” illustrations in this series, showing life above and below the ground.   I thought this would be a great book to inspire children to get outside to enjoy the spring weather with their families and perhaps do a little gardening!  This book has SO many curriculum connections – you could spend a week or more planning activities in science, math, art, and writing, so be sure to add this title to your STEAM collection!

This book is a delightful textual and visual celebration of gardening layered with a wonderful inter-generational story of a granddaughter and her Nana.  We follow the young girl and her grandmother as they journey through the year planning, planting, and harvesting their garden—and learn about all the animal and insect life that we don’t even see or suspect going on in the world “down in the dirt”. Added bonus is the informative back notes including an author’s note, bibliography and extra facts about the animal species encountered.

There are many versions of this book as a read-aloud available online, including the author, Kate Messner, reading it herself!

Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt | Flowering Minds

 

Podcast: Going Underground: Kidlit in the Labyrinth | Curious City ...

Lessons: 

After students listen to the story online, choose from any of the lessons below – or do them all!

  • Making Connections  – in the story, the girl is learning from her grandmother about many different aspects of gardening.  What connections do you make to this story?  What activities do you like to do with your grandparents?  What are some things they have taught you?                                                                                                Click HERE for the Primary Connections template.                                                            Click HERE for the Intermediate Connections template.
  • (For more lessons on Making Connections – see my book Reading Power)

 

  • KNEW-NEW” Connections – after reading (listening to) the story, invite students to record facts they already KNEW about gardening and NEW facts they learned.  There are also spaces for visual images and questions on this page.                        Click HERE for the KNEW-NEW the template.

 

  • Art – Draw (and label) a “split screen” picture (see sample below) of “above and below” the garden.

split screen garden

  • MathStudents brainstorm a list of vegetables they would like to plant in their “garden”.  Using a grid, they can plan out their garden, deciding where each vegetable should go and how much space (grid squares) it will take up.  This would be a perfect lead in to a lesson on AREA and PERIMETER.  I found this idea on Pinterest for planning a zoo, and while I would not do zoo planning with students (not a fan of them), I thought it would be a great idea for planning a garden!               Click here for the Math Garden Planning template 

Math zoo

  • Science – What does a seed need?  Students could learn about the “Fab Five” – five things a plant needs to grow:  sun, soil, space, air, and water

 

  • How To Writing “How to Plant a Seed”. Depending on whether your students have access to a garden, they could do some actual seed planting or just learn about it from one of the anchor books listed below and then write steps and tips on how to plant a seed.  (For more HOW TO writing ideas, see my book Nonfiction Writing Power or my new book, Powerful Writing Structures.)
  • Click HERE for the How To writing template for Primary (two pages)
  • Click HERE for the How To writing template for Intermediate.

Other lesson extensions:

  • Family Gardening Project – gardening with your family – students could join or  encourage their family to grow some vegetables or flowers and could participate in the planting and caring for the family garden.
  • Family Nature Activities:  Find backyard nature activities that students and families can do in their own backyard from the Project Learning Tree.
  • Inter-connectedness of nature  – students could learn and write about how plants and insects work together to support the cycle of nature.
  • Bug study – students choose one bug they learned about in the story and do a bug study.  Don’t forget the back-notes in the back of Kate Messner’s book that lists information about all the creatures included in the story.
  • Bug Identification – invite students to download the free iNaturalist app to practice taking photos of bugs and learning how to identify them (so cool!)  https://www.inaturalist.org/
  • Author studyKate Messner is an AMAZING writer who has written dozens of picture books, Nonfiction, and MG novels. Download the Kate Messner Author Study Guide for more ideas!

Below are other recommended anchor books you could use to support this lesson, featuring books about gardening and insects.  Check Epic Books or YouTube for online versions of these books.

Lola Plants a Garden – Anna McQuinn

We Are the Gardeners – Joanna Gaines and Kids

Plant the Tiny Seed Christie Matheson

Gardening For Beginners Osborne Books

Garden to Table

Garden to Table – Katherine Hengal

In My Garden – National Geographic Look and Learn

Backyard Bug Book for Kids – Lauren Davidson

Hello World! Backyard Bugs – Jill McDonald

 

If you are interested in more gardening education, here are some interesting websites I found:

https://kidsgardening.org/https://kidsgardening.org/in particular:   https://kidsgardening.org/blog-adapting-to-school-closures/

https://www.teachervision.com/search/gardening

https://growing-minds.org/

https://www.plt.org/activities-for-families/in-your-own-backyard/

Have a great week, everyone!  Hope these lessons inspire some ideas for your online or in-person learning this week.  Happy reading and happy gardening!

You are doing an amazing job!  There is a light at the end of this tunnel! You can do it!!!

 

 

 

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Filed under "How To" Writing, Connect, Ecosystems, environment, Gardening, Math, OLLI, Online Books and Lessons, Picture Book, Science, STEM, Writing Anchor book

Adrienne’s OLLI – Online Learning Lesson Idea #5 WANTED! Criminals of the Animal Kingdom

Hello everyone!  Hope you all had a restful long weekend and are enjoyed time away from school.  Things seem to be “opening up” slowly,  with “in person teaching”  scheduled to start in a few weeks.  I know that the thought of being back in schools with children brings with it a range of emotion and I am sending you positive thoughts and energy as you transition to yet another version of our “new normal”.

Thank you for the positive responses to my weekly OLLI  posts “Online Learning Lesson Ideas“.  I’m happy that you are finding them helpful for your distance lessons.  You can see my first OLLI HERE (The Hike), my second HERE. (If I Could Build A School).  My Mother’s Day lesson is HERE.  And last week, my OLLI lesson based was based on the book Everybody Needs a Rock.  You can view that lesson HERE.

Wanted! Criminals of the Animal Kingdom

Anchor Book:

This week, I’m excited to share WANTED!  Criminals of the Animal Kingdom a new nonfiction book, written by Heather Tekavec and published by Kidscan Press.   This book is a such a genius idea! I love it!  I can see it being a HUGE hit with kids. (Attention TL’s!!!)  The book combines facts about rather uncommon, quirky animals and turns them into a hilarious memorable Fact File Rap Sheets.  Each double page introduces a ‘criminal’ and gives details of their ‘crime’, for example, the cuckoo who steals other bird’s nests and “lets the other mother do all the work to hatch the eggs.”

Lesson:

Of course, while reading this book, I immediately thought about how much kids would enjoy making their own MOST WANTED page about a unique, weird and wacky animal criminal.  Unfortunately, this book is so new that there is no online version, so you may need to share one of these images with them as a reference if you do not have your own copy to read aloud online.  I have also included several additional anchor books that can be found online.  After learning about some of these weird and wacky creatures, students can choose one from a list (see list below) and do a little research about them.

Click HERE for the Weird Animal Research Page

Here’s the website where I found many of these strange animals that students may find helpful for their research:  https://www.travelchannel.com/interests/outdoors-and-adventure/photos/15-of-the-strangest-animals-in-the-world-and-where-to-see-them

There are also many “Weird Animal” educational videos students could view including this one:  https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/videos/really-weird-animals/

Some key teaching points to this activity:

  • identifying the crime – helping the students turn one of the animal features into a “CRIME”.
  • criminal vocabulary: dangerous, frightening, sneaky, shady, sketchy, identity theft, bribery, burglary, hides, corruption, crime, fraud, loots, steals, pick-pockets, smuggles, disguises, trespasses, vandalizes, chases, 
  • Criminal name and Aliases – helping students come up with a clever criminal name for the animal

After students have gathered facts about their “criminal animal” (can I invent a new word: “craminal”?)  they can use the template I created based on the anchor book, to make their own “WANTED Weird Animal Rap Sheet” poster.

Click HERE for the WANTED Weird Animal Rap Sheet template for Primary.

Click HERE for the WANTED Weird Animal Rap Sheet template for Intermediate.

If you or your students prefer, they could design their own WANTED poster.  Here is a great site for free WANTED posters templates:  http://templatelab.com/wanted-poster-template/

Other anchor books you could use to support this lesson, all featuring odd or ugly animals with interesting, unusual features.  Check Epic Books or YouTube for online versions of these books.

Animals Nobody Loves – Seymour Simon

What Do You Do When Something Wants to Eat You? – Steve Jenkins

Creature Features – Steve Jenkins 

Ugly Animals Laura Marsh

National Geographic Readers: Odd Animals (Pre-Reader) by [Rose Davidson]

Odd Animals – Rose Davidson

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The Ugly Animals – We Can’t All Be Pandas – Simon Watt

 

Have a great week, everyone!  Hope this lesson is one that you can possibly use for your online teaching this week.

You are doing an amazing job!  There is a light at the end of this tunnel! You can do it!!!

 

 

 

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Filed under 2020 Releases, Animals, New Books, OLLI, Online Books and Lessons, Picture Book, Science, Writing Anchor book

Adrienne’s OLLI (Online Learning Lesson Idea) #4 – Everybody Needs a Rock

Hello everyone!  Hope you all had a restful weekend and were able to celebrate all the great moms out there!   I know some districts and provinces are in the process of gradually returning to modified versions of “in person teaching” but many are still trying to determine what that looks like.  No matter what your teaching situation is at the moment, I am sending you positive thoughts and energy!

Many of you have been using my OLLI – “Online Learning Lesson Ideas“.  (You can see my first OLLI HERE and second HERE.  Last week, I shared a “How To” lesson connected to Mother’s Day.  You can see that lesson HERE.

This week, I’m excited to share “Everybody Needs A Rock” by Byrd Baylor,  one of my favorite books, (yes, I say that a lot!) with your students.  This book and lesson invites students on a wonderful “outdoor” activity, as well as an act of community kindness!

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I love rocks.  I love their feel, their color pallet, their smell, their spirit.   Rocks are magical – each has its own history; its own journey; its own story.    Like snowflakes, no two rocks are the same.  But unlike snowflakes, rocks can be held, saved, and collected.  I collect them wherever I am at a beach.  I have pebbles from Spanish Banks, Haida Gwaii, Horby Island,  Mayne Island, the Sunshine Coast, Quadra Island, Saltspring Island, Hernando Island, and many other West Coast beaches.

Some people have certain rocks that they are always on the lookout for.  My mum loved striped pebbles.  She called them “Licorice All-Stones”.

Striped beach rocks | Etsy

Others are on the lookout for speckled pebbles.  Size and shape matter less to collectors than those splattered speckles.

Pacific Ocean Speckled Stones Round Conglomerate Spotted | Etsy

My childhood friend’s mother collected “wish rocks” – grey rocks with a single white line circling the center.  She said they were good luck.  The thicker the white stripe, the better chances of your wish coming true.

Wish rocks | Etsy

Another friend of mine loves searching for heart-shaped rocks.  These are harder to find, but when you find one, it is like discovering a hidden treasure.

Common Beach Stone Identification (Including Dolomite, Quartz ...

Me – I am a collector of smooth, shiny, flat stones that fit perfectly in the palm of my hand.  There is something comforting about these rocks to me.  Something sacred.

Highly Polished Slate-Black Fire Stones | Stone Decorative

Because of my love of rocks, this week’s anchor book Everybody Needs a Rock by Byrd Baylor is special to me. (Can you say connections?) It was first published in 1974, and while the black and white drawings may not grab you initially, I guarantee the engaging, fresh voice of the narrator certainly will.   The story outlines ten simple, but important rules to finding the perfect rock and inspires the reader to follow the rules and go out to find their own special rock.

Everybody Needs A Rock Rules:

      1.  Find your rock anywhere.

      2. Shhhhhh… choose a rock quietly.

      3. Look at your rock eye to eye.

      4. Don’t choose a rock that’s too big.

      5. Don’t choose a rock that’s too small.

      6. Choose a rock that fits into your hand.

      7. Look for the perfect color.

      8. Choose a rock that has an interesting shape.

      9. Sniff your rock. (they all smell different!)

      10. Don’t ask for help.  You can do this all by yourself.

The other thing I like about this book is that, while it can certainly be read literally about the joys of hunting for rocks, following ten tips, and finding one that you want to save, there is also the underlying idea that everyone needs something solid to hold onto during challenging times. A rather timely book, wouldn’t you say?    It is also a gentle reminder to time to notice and connect to nature and to the things that really matter.

Watch the Youtube Read Aloud here:


After the students watch and listen to the story, invite your students to use these rules to go rock hunting this week.  They can do this in their yard, at a local park, or perhaps on an outing with their parents.  Encourage them to follow the 10 rules to find their special rock (they can download the rules so they don’t forget!)

After they find their perfect rock, they can draw and color a detailed picture and write about their rock finding experience – where they found it, why they picked it, etc.

Here is the Ten Rules Template (students can use this when searching for their rocks and also add their own rule!)

Here is the Primary Template

Here is the Intermediate Template

Lesson Extension – The “Giving Back” Rock

(Thank you, Cheryl, for this wonderful idea!!)

During our morning runs since the city shut down in March, my friend Cheryl and I have noticed painted rocks with lovely messages placed under trees along the trails.  Each time we run, in fact, we notice more and more of these cheerful, encouraging rocks.

Today: Rotary Trail RocksMessages on rocks help one neighborhood cope with coronavirus ...Steven Bright's tweet - "⁦@ronald_cohn⁩ ... someone in Oakville is ...

To extend this lesson, why not encourage students to find a second special rock to paint and leave somewhere in their neighborhood to brighten up someone’s day.  This “Giving Back” rock can be something the students paint at home, perhaps with their family.  They could drop off the rock on a neighbour’s porch or yard, or find a spot in a local park to leave it.  Younger students will likely need some help with the painting and planting of this special rock but I could see this being an activity the entire family could get involved in.  Invite your students to take photos of their sharing rock where they leave it in the neighbourhood.

Here is the “Giving Back Rock” template for Primary

Here is the “Giving Back Rock” template for Intermediate

Thanks for stopping by!  Have a great week, everyone!  You are doing a great job!

Happy Rock Hunting!

Check out more writing lessons in my new book, Powerful Writing Structures 

See you soon for more OLLI posts!

 

 

 

 

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Filed under How To Writing, Lesson Ideas, Links to content, OLLI, Read-Aloud, Science

Adrienne’s OLLI (Online Learning Lesson Idea) #3 – How to Be My Mom

Hello everyone!  Hope you all had a restful weekend and were able to take a break from planning your online lessons and enjoyed some time with family and perhaps some outdoor fun.  I know some districts and provinces are in the process of gradually returning to modified versions of “in person teaching”, but most remain focusing on distance learning.  No matter what your teaching situation is at the moment, I am sending you positive thoughts and energy!

Many of you have been using my OLLI – “Online Learning Lesson Ideas“.  (You can see my first OLLI HEREand second HERE. ) This week, in preparation for Mother’s Day, my OLLI is all about MOMS!  Taking an idea from my book Nonfiction Writing Power from the chapter on Instructional/Procedural writing, why not have your students write  instructions for “How To Be My Mom”.   Now I realize that it might be challenging for some of the younger students to be working on this lesson at home without their mom seeing it, but you could encourage them to try working on it when mom is not looking!

As always, I like to start with an anchor book! I know there are many great Mother’s Day books out there, but every year, my “go to” book is always Anthony Browne’s “My Mum” (UK edition) or “My Mom” (US edition).  It’s simple, fun, has great illustrations, great similes, and is a perfect book for making connections!   And if you don’t have a copy that you can share online,  it is available as a read-aloud on YouTube!  Hurray!

My Mom: Browne, Anthony, Browne, Anthony: Amazon.com.mx: Libros

After watching the video, students can use the optional planner page to brainstorms ideas about their own Mom.  Using their ideas, I like to have them turn their statements about their moms into instructions using simple instructional phrases or words such as:

  Always….    Remember to…    Try to…    Never…   Don’t….  Be…  

Encourage your students to come up with ideas unique to their moms.  See example below:

How to Be My Mummy

Always drink coffee at Tim Hortons

Remember to answer the phones at the dentist office.

Never eat raw sushi (or else you’ll get sick!)

Wear your sparkly sari when you go to weddings.

Make delicious chocolate chip pancakes on the weekend.

Go walking with Auntie every Saturday morning.

Love your family more than anything.

Be smart and encouraging.

 

Here is the read-aloud on YouTube

Here is the optional planner for Primary.

Here is the optional planner for Intermediate.

Here is the template for Primary.

Here is the template for Intermediate.

You will find more “How To” instructional lessons in my Nonfiction Writing Power book and my new Powerful Writing Structures book.

Thanks for stopping by!  Have a great week, everyone!  You are doing a great job!

Come back again for more OLLI posts!

Happy Mother’s Day to all you Moms, Grandmas and Caregivers out there!

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Immagination, Lesson Ideas, Links to content, Maker Spaces, New Books, OLLI, STEM