Category Archives: Reading Power

Guest Post #4 – Reading Power in China by Jennifer Gardner

I am pleased to welcome Jennifer Gardner, extraordinary teacher, administrator, teacher-leader and best of all, my friend!  Although we don’t see each other often, we have a strong “connection” and share a deep passion for teaching, learning and BOOKS! We first met over 10 years ago in Vernon when I was presenting a Reading Power workshop there.  Jennifer embraced Reading Power and it became her school focus for many years.  She is now bringing “deep thinking” to Maple Leaf School in Dalian, China. Welcome, Jennifer!

I met Adrienne in 2005 when I was working as a Literacy Lead Teacher with SD#22 (Vernon). When I attended her Reading Power workshop and realized that her work was based on solid research in a very useable format, I was convinced that this work needed to be adopted and used!! And so began my journey with Reading Power.  Over the next 7 years, Adrienne continued to write books and give workshops. I became a principal and worked with incredible teachers to improve reading in my school. Throughout these years, Adrienne and I have continued our ‘book bond’ – a bond that is focused on supporting teachers, as they teach comprehension in a visible and explicit way.

In 2014, my husband and I moved to Dalian, China to work with Maple Leaf International School System. I was hired to improve reading comprehension skills in a Middle School with 1200 students. I had 30 ESL Bilingual teachers who began this journey with me. It was an incredible journey as I introduced Reading Power as a way to help students ‘think’ in English, while they are reading. These students go from a predominantly Chinese school (10 classes per week of English instruction) to full time English in grade 10 with BC Curriculum and BC teachers! The challenge was to help these bilingual teachers understand the difference between “rote learning of vocabulary and grammar” versus “thinking about what they are reading” in English.

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I started with having the Grade 7 students create a Chinese version of the Reading Power poster so that we could add ‘brain parts’ to show the ‘thinking ‘ the students needed to do to make sense of the text. Several students created posters – notice the students in the posters are wearing their Maple Leaf uniforms.

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How fun was that! I met with teachers weekly to go over the Reading Power lesson and to model, for them, how we need to help children think. Since good English pictures books were hard to come from, I created ppt’s with picture books I brought from Canada. In this way, I could use 1 picture book in 27 classrooms!  The bilingual teachers loved the support, they could add personal pictures or stories to the ppts and every week I went into classrooms to support them and help them navigate their way. In the course of one year, we introduced Connecting, Questioning and Inferring in an explicit and fun way. The students loved stories like Mean Jean, Courage, Miss Nelson is Missing, Willy the Champ, Yo?Yah!, Good Dog Carl, No!David to name a few. Finding great books for Chinese Middle School boys (with limited English) was my challenge. However, the students cheered whenever we would have a Reading Power lesson. (That was a good sign).

After that one year I returned to Canada to care for my father. To my delight, Reading Power continued on with the Bilingual teachers at the Middle School.  They continued because they noticed that the students were engaged and eager to learn English.

Now, this year, I have returned to China to take on the role of Professional Developer for Literacy Improvement for the ESL Department – 18 different cities, with 32 ESL Directors. Our focus will be Reading Power and Writing Power, K-9. We just finished 3 intensive days of sessions involving ‘changing the way we teach English to improve literacy’. Reading Power is a big part of this change – system wide.

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It is such a privilege to work with these ESL Directors, teachers, and students. They are eager to learn and are so respectful of the support they are receiving. I am impressed with their work ethic and their willingness to teach in a way that supports students’ learning!

Having Adrienne as my colleague and friend, has been a tremendous support. Her work is finding its way across oceans and continents!  Reading Power is now being translated into Mandarin! Thumbs up!!

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RP Chinese (2)

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Jennifer Gardner

Contact info:

 

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Guest Post #3 – Reading Power in Tanzania by Ashley Aaoki

I am happy to welcome Ashley Aaoki as my third guest blogger.  Ashley is a beginning teacher in SD 67 in beautiful Okanagan.  She is passionate about teaching and about sharing her love of learning to students and teachers in all corners of the globe.  In this post, she shares her extraordinary and inspiring journey from her childhood days of “playing teacher” to bringing the joy of reading, writing, and learning to students and teachers in an orphanage and school in Arusha, Tanzania (Africa).

“Stand against the grain, get a purpose in your heart and ask yourself , “What can my life do?'” – Benjamin Cole Brown

Education has always been at my heart center. I can recall memories of the young(er) Ashley standing in front of the chalkboard, which perfectly hung in our playroom, assigning spelling tests and math quizzes to my little sister – she was naive and I was bossy! Evolving from that heart center laid another passion: traveling, but not any “type” of travel. I wanted to have authentic conversations with the local people, work alongside children who (just like my students) dreamed, laughed, and cried, and learn about what (extra)ordinary people face every single day. On a single piece of paper I wrote, “travel to Africa”. It was a dream placed in my heart and I kept it there for a long time. That was until the summer of 2016 when the dream in my heart and reality met.

Last year I had the privilege to travel as a teacher chaperone to Arusha, Tanzania. I had just closed the door on my first year of teaching and was coming off an emotional high. For a year I had been planning, preparing, and dreaming about my exciting journey ahead to bring twenty students and three teacher chaperones (I was one of the chaperones) to Tanzania, Africa.  We dedicated four labour intensive workweeks in an Orphanage/School located in the slums of Arusha. The work was challenging, the conversations I with those at the orphanage broke, yet it also captured my heart. Every. Single. Piece. Maybe it was the conversations I had with the children just like the ones my mom would have had with me as a child, “You are so loved, valuable, beautiful, and worthy!”, or maybe it was sitting on the rocky orphanage floor reading to the children just like my dad would have read to my sister and I at night. It might have been every moment, big or small. Whatever it was, I knew I needed to return and give more of myself.

When I signed up for the second trip, I spent a lot of time thinking about the skills I had and what I could offer, specifically to the teachers at the orphanage. Several conversations had been exchanged during the previous summer about professional development, which sparked the teachers curiosity; simply because professional development was beyond anything they had experienced before. I knew that collaboration, especially in this capacity could make a significant difference. I just didn’t know quite how.

Shortly after spring break had concluded (and a conversation was had with one of my colleagues and fellow chaperones) I had a vision of offering a reading and writing workshop for the teachers. There were many unanswered questions I had: How do I (a second year, 23 year old teacher) offer a workshop to teachers?  Do I really know what I’m doing?  What should I teach them?  But I knew that if I asked the “right” people, there could be support given. I began by asking a mentor of mine for ideas and suggestions.   At that point, she suggested I contact Adrienne Gear.  Now, I have a small confession to make: Adrienne is essentially a celebrity in my teaching life.  Not only was Adrienne a teaching celebrity, I also used all of her books in my classroom during my first year of teaching (Reading Power and Writing Power – fiction and nonfiction), proudly displayed the Reading Power Poster on the chalkboard; had attended every workshop or presentation she had given in our area, and reviewed her blog weekly for book recommendations for the classroom. I knew how powerful her books had been for me, as a beginning teacher, in providing a focused direction, plan, and process for teaching my students in both reading and writing. At times (especially during my first year of teaching) I would feel so overwhelmed with the tasks of teaching my students how to read and write and I found myself cherry picking from a variety of sites – including Pinterest.  I felt myself often existing at a crossroads between the “let’s make cute anchor charts that we’ll use once because we can’t remember what its purpose was” and progressing my students along as individuals who could be effective, capable, imaginative readers and writers. The problem wasn’t my students –  it was my lack of direction, failed processes, and confusing plans. But Adrienne’s books were straight forward and transformed my teaching and I dreamed of the endless possibilities of sharing these ideas with the teachers in Tanzania.

And so I tried to be “cool” (inside I was NOT!) and contacted Adrienne directly.  Following a couple of email exchanges, she told me that she would be more than willing to support the workshop by providing a list of anchor books that I might choose from as well as offering to donate some books for the teachers.  (cue Ashley celebrating and dancing like she’s 5 at a birthday party shortly after having cake!). She contacted her publisher at Pembroke, Mary Macchiusi, and together they donated 20 books – ten Reading Power and ten Writing Power books – to give to the teachers.  I spent several weeks carefully selecting the activities and information I was to share. Anchor charts were made with my neatest elementary teacher printing, and several books were purchased (thanks to several fundraising projects that happened within our district and my school). I packed up all of the items ready to be placed on the planes and felt as prepared as I possibly could. This would be a complete surprise for the teachers, and my excitement was building!

On one of our first days at the orphanage my colleague gathered all of the teachers and asked me to share the news. I can distinctly remember one teacher looking up at the sky and thanking God for me. The excitement shared amongst the teachers was palpable and I mentioned to them that I wished I could have bottled it up and saved the excitement for times in my life when I needed it. Throughout the weeks that followed (before the workshop) the teachers would seek me out on the worksite and share their excitement “oh, Ashley we cannot wait for you to teach us.”

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Teacher Justin arrived one hour before the workshops schedule beginning time. He could hardly wait! Along with teaching the most vulnerable children in Arusha’s slums, Justin is the schools social worker representative. This means he completes home visits on a regular basis encouraging young boys and girls to go back to school.

 

On the day of the workshop, I lined up the newly purchased picture books and novels, placed the Reading and Writing Power Books in front of each seat with a duotang filled with resources, a pen, and a highlighter. Some teachers, eager to begin, arrived an hour early! We began walking our way through the components of the Reading Power book, and (taking a page out of Adrienne’s “book” on how to present) I presented lessons that I had completed in my classroom.

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Ten teachers and the Headmaster joined me in a day of learning and growing – together!

 

The teachers were provided time to ask questions and while some were nervous each question gave me more insight into what teaching is like at the orphanage, and in Tanzania. Some of the comments shared included:

“I’m wondering how I teach this process to children with disabilities?”

This comment struck me as individuals who are disabled in Arusha are considered an inconvenience. They are often the poorest people as many don’t see employ ability for them as an option. My response to her was a Swahili term “polle, polle” (slowly, slowly). That great things can happen to those that take their time.

Following this comment another teacher placed his hand up and said:

“I’m wondering if this process will change my students personalities?”

Caught slightly off guard, I looked at this teacher and said: “No Edward, this won’t change your students. But it will give you insight into who your students are as people.”

 The workshop ended with one of the teachers (who I absolutely adore) stating the following:

“I don’t know if you know this Ashley, but Tanzanian culture does not recognize reading as a common practice. Books are incredibly expensive and when people do read it’s for the comics in our local newspaper. Before this workshop I looked at these picture books here and thought ‘what do these teach my pupils? What purpose do they have?’ Now, I see that my pupils can learn about things that I’m trying to teach on my own. Lessons like helping one another out or realizing it’s okay to not be perfect. So, thank you. Thank you!”

As the teachers left following a remarkable workshop each one thanked me several times and many hugs were exchanged. Some were showing me they were connecting (using the Gear hand signal) and one even sought me out days later and spent time regurgitating as much information that he learnt as possible.

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The teachers were unbelievably PROUD to be holding their new Reading and Writing Power books. I was PROUD of them for demonstrating both growth and vulnerability throughout the day of learning!

 

I cannot express in words how thankful I am to both Adrienne Gear and Mary Macchiusi at Pembroke Publishing for their support in making this workshop a possibility. The books were provided to the teachers as a result of their generous hearts (and donations). This was a truly magical day for the teachers and me. For a group of teachers, their eyes were opened to the possibilities that books (and reading) have in a classroom setting; the teachers reflected on what they had learned and were thrilled to implement new ideas into their classroom; and the director recognized how revolutionary this particular learning development was for a group who had (up until that point) never participated in professional development.

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Following the workshop presentation, I completed a Reading Power Lesson with these students. We discussed what connecting was, and practiced connecting while listening to a culturally relevant picture book “Rain School” by James Rumford. The students also practiced reading to themselves. The library was filled with the sound of silence as the students opened up the wonders found in a great book!

 

On our final day at the Orphanage, as our students were saying their farewells with the children that quickly became “theirs”, I made a point of connecting with one teacher (Justin). He held my hand and thanked me again for teaching him. Just before I left he said, “Before you arrived,  Ashley, the teachers were very sad. This work is hard, and it was like a grey cloud was sitting over us. When you taught us, you lifted us up. You lifted up our spirits and gave us hope. Just like the sun”. I looked at him and said, “That’s what life is about. We lift each other up, hold one another’s hands and walk together”.

This type of work has been my cause, allowed me to stand against the grain, and has reminded me how important the question “What can my life do?”  is.  I know that I have just started but will continue to find the answer.

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Ashley Aoki was born, raised, and is currently living and working in the beautiful Okanagan Valley working (School District #67) where she will begin her third year of teaching this fall.   Traveling to other countries has been an integral part of her life and teaching practice.  Her passion is teaching her students about global issues and encouraging them to participate in activities that make a difference in the school, local, or global community. This past year, the students in her school (and previous school) raised over $1500.00 to support the students and teachers at the Arusha Orphanage including new picture books, novels, school supplies, land shoes.  She considers herself a teacher/humanitarian, and recognizes the significant role education has on a global scale, seeing it as one of the key components that pulls individuals out of poverty.

You can leave a comment for Ashley below or contact her directly at: aaoki@summer.com

 

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Picture Book 10 for 10 (2017) – 10 New Picture Books for Your Reading Power Collection!

 

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I’m excited to be, once again, participating in this summer’s 10 for 10 Picture Book celebration! #pb10for10   This annual celebration of picture books is hosted by Cathy from Reflect and Refine: Building a Learning Community and Mandy from Enjoy and Embrace Learning.  Hard to believe this is my fifth year of participating in this event! (you can read my 2016 post here2015 post here2014 post here and 2013 here. )  Each year, the blogging community chooses 10 picture books on a range of themes – from diversity, to bullying, to writing, to conservation.  It is an amazing opportunity to explore new picture books related to a wide range of themes.  (It can also be a little hard on your bank account, if you are anything like me!)

This year, as with my previous 10 for 10 posts, I have organized my post to feature new releases that support Reading Power strategies.  I have included two books for each: Connecting, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, and Transform (synthesizing).  The response has been positive each year, so I am continuing the tradition!  For those who are already using RP, these would be my recommendations for adding or replenishing your collection this year!

(Please note that I have received advanced copies of a few of these titles so some might only be available for pre-order.)

CONNECT

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Now Antoinette Portis

This is a beautiful new book from Canadian writer/illustrator Antoinette Portis. Such a sweet story about a girl whose favorite things are whatever she’s currently experiencing. I would definitely use this with for connecting to favorite things (personal preferences),  but could also be used for inferring a deeper meaning about living in the moment.  Great for mindfulness and gratitude.

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There Might Be Lobsters – Carolyn Crimi

This is a wonderful story about dealing with fears and anxiety. Sukie is a very small dog with a really big fear of almost everything, especially lobster.  Spending a day at the beach with her favorite person is a nightmare for Sukie as she thinks about all the dangers that might be there.  When her favorite toy, “Chunka Munka” (love the name!) starts to drift into the tide, Sukie must face her fears!  I love that this book is told from the dog’s perspective and also you need to read it out loud just so you can say “Chunka Munka” lots of times!  Great illustrations!

QUESTION

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Questions AskedJostein Gaarder

Well, you can’t get a better book for introducing deep-thinking questions to your class than a book filled with them!  This book introduces readers to rather complex philosophical questions in a simple format.  Gorgeous,  soft-pallet paintings that capture the emotions of this little boy wandering and pondering through an open landscape.  This would be more suited for older students and would stimulate deep-thinking conversations.

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Mr. Benjamin’s Suitcase of SecretsPei-Yu Chang

What could be in his suitcase? This is the question readers wonder as they read this historical picture book based on the life and persecution Walter Benjamin – a Jewish philosopher forced to flee the Nazi occupied Germany during WWII.   When asked why he couldn’t just leave the suitcase behind, he responds:  “The contents of this case can change everything.”   But in the end, we never know what was inside – the perfect starting point for discussing possibilities. Such an important story depicting a world where ideas and opposition are seen as dangerous by those in power.  This is a book I would definitely recommend for units on WWII with intermediate or middle school. Incredible paper cut and mixed media illustrations.

VISUALIZE

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A River – Marc Martin

Oooooo… this book is stunning!  Gorgeous illustrations, detailed poetic text.. this book is a magical journey of a young girl in a silver boat following a river through jungles, farmland and eventually the sea.   But I think it could also be a wonderful introduction to the geography of rivers and their tributaries and habitats.    A marvelous, gentle journey to visualize!

Things to Do – Elaine Magliaro

This is a delightful book, perfect for visualizing but could also be used for making connections and an anchor book for “How To”  writing.  Reads like a collection of “How To” poems centered around a child’s day, capturing little things in life as well as different weather and seasons. Lovely vocabulary (great triple scoops!) and gorgeous illustrations.  This book is pure joy!  LOVE this one!

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Draw the Line – Kathryn Otoshi

The amazing Katheryn Otoshi (author of One, Two, and Zero) has, once again, given us a book filled with rich discussion points.  Draw the Line is so much more than a book about lines.  It is a beautiful wordless picture book about friendship, creativity, community, conflict, resolution – and a “line” connecting us all.  A must have book for inferring, connecting, transform…. Brilliant!

Town is By the Sea – Joanne Schwartz

A simple, poetic story set in the early 1900’s in Cape Bretton, Nova Scotia tells of the challenging life of a mining family.  A young boy goes about his daily activities in the sunshine by the sea while, in contrast, his father works underground in the mines.  The writing is so beautifully descriptive and would be a great anchor book for descriptive, sensory writing or Visualizing, but also Inferring.  The words are lulling and almost haunting and the illustrations are gorgeous.

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Life – Cynthia Rylant

Cynthia Rylant is definitely one of my top favorite children’s writers. I find her books to be so life-affirming, full of wonder and hope. Her new book “Life” is simply stunning. “What do you love about life?” is the question asked to many different animals. Through their responses, we are gifted with a wonderful message about life: how it constantly changes, the beauty of it, the darkness, and the wonders all around it. Simple, lyrical text and beautiful illustrations by Brendan Wenzel – it is a calm and reassuring book.  I would use the “one word” activity for this book with the word “Life”.  Give the word to the students before and after reading and see how their thinking changes.   Love.

Why Am I Me? – Paige Britt

This gorgeous book celebrates diversity and identity in the most respectful and thoughtful while exploring the deep question – Why am I me?  Would be great for both young children but would stimulate great discussions and writing responses from an older class.  A great “Me to We” book as readers are invited to imagine a world where there is no you or me, only we.

La La La: A Story of Hope – Kate DiCamillo

Just had to include this almost wordless picture book by the great Kate DiCamillo that tells the story of a lonely young girl who is longing to be heard.  The illustrations are endearing, gentle and filled with emotion.  This book invites inferences because of the sparse text, connections to being lonely and the desire to belong, and transforming because of the hopefulness that you feel.  As I always say – I know when a book is good when I don’t know where to put it!  And here is a perfect example of that!

 

There you have it!  My 2017 Picture Book 10 for 10!  Thanks for stopping by and I hope you found one or two books to add to your Reading Power collection!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under 2017 releases, Connect, Infer, New Books, Picture Book 10 for 10, Reading Power, Transform, Visualize

Ten for Ten 2016: Top 10 New Picture Books for Your Reading Power Collection

This annual summer celebration of picture books is hosted by Cathy from Reflect and Refine: Building a Learning Community and Mandy from Enjoy and Embrace Learning. This is my forth year of participating in this event – you can read my 2015 post here2014 post here and 2013 here.   Each year, the blogging community chooses 10 picture books on a range of themes – from diversity, to bullying, to writing, to conservation.  For the past 3 years, I have organized my 10 for 10 post around Reading Power – featuring two new releases for each RP strategy: Connecting, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, and Transform (synthesizing).  The response has been positive each year, so I am continuing the tradition!  For those who are already using RP, these would be my recommendations for adding or replenishing your collection this year!

CONNECT

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 Thunder Boy Jr. – Sherman Alexie

Connecting to names, origin of names, father-son relationships and family.  I love the voice in this delightful book.  Gorgeous illustrations and perfect for your aboriginal collection as well.

2. The Class – Boni Ashburn

Follow 20 different students from 19 different homes as they get ready kindergarten.  This book is a true celebration of diversity with children from many different backgrounds, morning rituals, routines, families, and ways of getting ready to go to school. Adorable illustrations and a perfect ‘CONNECT’ book for your early primary students.

QUESTION

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3. The Night Gardener – The Tan Brothers

Who keeps cutting the trees into animal sculptures during the night?  It is the magical mystery this book will slowly reveal.  Another book with illustrations you will linger over and a unique and creative story that will have your students wondering.

4. Follow the Moon Home – Deborah Hopkinson & Philippe Cousteau

How can a community save the sea turtles of the South Carolina coast?  Powerful story of how young people can make a difference – inspiring and beautiful.  Could also be used for Transform.

VISUALIZE

5. Finding Wild – Megan Wagner

Two kids set off on an adventure away from their urban home and discover all the beauty of the natural world. This book is so full of triple scoop words, I can hardly stand it! Perfect for visualizing and an anchor book for descriptive writing.

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6. I Hear a Pickle – Rachel Isadora

Sweet, simple introduction to the five senses for early primary students.  Great for teaching that visualizing is not just about what we see!

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7. The Whale – Ethan Murrow & Vita Murrow

Wow – this book is truly a remarkable pencil-sketch wordless picture book.  Two children are out to prove that the rumored Giant Spotted Whale in their town is real or a myth.  This is a book where you really need to take your time to read the pictures.  The newspaper headlines also help to tell the story and are perfect for practicing inferring.

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Grandad’s Island – Benji Davies

Benji Davis gifts us with an extraordinary, thought-provoking book about life, death and love.  Poignant, gracefully told story about a young boy trying to understand why his grandfather is no longer in his life.  What makes it so touching is how subtle the message is – leaving the reader with spaces to wonder and to think.

TRANSFORM

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Ada’s Violin – Susan Hood

The extraordinary true tale of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay, an orchestra made up of children playing instruments built from recycled trash. Inspiring and filled with hope.

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10. Be the Change: A Grandfather Gandhi Story – Arun Gandhi & Bethany Hegedus

How can throwing away a worn-down pencil hurt anyone? How can wastefulness lead to violence? With the help of his grandfather, Arun learns how every wasteful act, no matter how small, affects others.  A wonderful transforming story.

There you have it!  My top 10 for 10 picture books for 2016!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Filed under 2016 releases, New Books, Picture Book 10 for 10, Reading Power

Top Ten Tuesday – Top 10 Professional Books For Summer Reading

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Summer time means a little more time to read and reflect on our teaching practice and a chance to catch up on some new professional books.  With the full implementation of the redesigned here in B.C.,  I’m turning to many of these books for ideas and inspiration.  While I do not anticipate getting through ALL of these books, I have some of them beside my bed, some on order and am hoping to get my hands and head through all of them before summer is over.   Certainly these books are getting the ‘BUZZ’ in teacher circles… and I’m proud to say that many of them are written by true north strong and free Canadian writers!  flag

Here are my top ten professional books in my summer TBR pile…

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1. One Without the Other: Stories of Unity Through Diversity and InclusionShelley Moore   flag

Seems fitting that number one on my list is called ONE!  Shelley Moore is a teacher and inclusive consultant in Richmond, B.C. who is rockin’ it as a presenter, TED Talks speaker and now published author.  She is dynamic, funny and passionate about inclusion. Her ‘7-10 split‘ bowling metaphor for inclusion is extraordinary.  If you have never seen it, you can watch it here.  This book is on the top of my must read books this summer!

2.  Innovate with Ipad; Lessons to Transform Learning in the Classroom – Karen Lirenman and Kristen Wideen  flag

I’m SO excited (and proud ) to read this brand new book by these two amazing Canadian teachers and Ipad experts.  I know Karen personally and know how hard she has worked and what extraordinary, innovative things she does with iPADS in her classroom.  This is a must have book for every school!  The book is clearly laid out and shows teachers some basic aps that you can download which can help engage your students in learning and creating independently and creatively.  I love the way they include sections for beginners and more advanced learners, along with quick tips and suggestions on how best to integrate Ipad lessons into all aspects of your teaching.  I also appreciate the fact that these are real teachers who have tried all of these lessons as well as the adaptation of the lessons for teachers who may only have access to one or two Ipads rather than a whole class.  Great job, Karen and Kristen!

2. DIY Literacy: Teaching Tools for Differentiation, Rigor and Independence – Kate Roberts & Maggie Beattie Roberts

There has been a lot of recent buzz about this new resource and I’m excited to share it.  (Just in case there are any teachers who are old like me, DIY stands for ‘DO IT YOURSELF’! )  Maggie & Kate Roberts share four visual teaching tools–demonstration notebooks, bookmarks, charts, and microprogressions–that, if used well, can assist students in becoming truly independent.  This is another wonderful, practical guide for improving your classroom practice!  Wise. Smart. Practical. Doable. Funny. Inspiring.  So easy to read.  The authors provide additional materials on their website, blog and through WEBISODES (another new concept for me!) so there is a lot of additional material to supplement the book.  You can read more about the book and the authors here – http://www.heinemann.com/blog/what-does-diy-literacy-mean/

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3. Writers ARE Readers: Flipping Reading Instruction into Writing Opportunities –                  Lester Laminack and Reba Wadsworth,

Long before Reading Power was ever developed, I did my masters on the  READING-WRITING connection. This book re-affirms everything I know about how reading and writing are so closely linked and that teaching them in isolation is not how we should be teaching.  There are many things to love about this book, but for me, it is the readability of the text and the easy conversational tone that puts it high on my new favorite list.   It feels as if the authors are sitting in your living room talking to you for part of the time and then you are suddenly in a classroom watching them teach.  It’s like having a literacy coach, a master teacher and a literacy expert every time you open the book.  LOVE this one!

4. Developing Self-Regulated Learners – Deborah L. Butler, Leyton Schnellert,  Nancy E. Perry  flag

So proud to be teaching in a province so filled with amazing, dedicated and passionate educators like the authors of this book.  This book focuses on research, theory and practice into SLR – Self Regulated Learners.  It is designed to support special education, classroom practice and educational psychology courses in Teacher Education programs.

5. Craft Moves – Lesson Sets for Teaching Writing with Mentor Texts – Stacey Shubitz

While it is not a new concept to me to use picture books to inspire writing, in Craft Moves, Stacey Shubitz, co-founder of the Two Writing Teachers website, uses twenty recently published picture books and creates more than 180 lessons to teach various ‘crafts’ – otherwise known as traits or techniques.  I appreciate that the books she uses are recent,  that she promotes the use of picture books in both lower and upper elementary and that she includes sample lessons and suggestions for managing writer’s workshop and effective small groups.  This book has just been released so only available through STENHOUSE.  

6. Marvelous Mini-Lessons for Teaching – Nonfiction Writing K-3 – Lori Jamison Rogg  flag

If you are  primary teacher, Lori Jamison Rogg’s ‘Marvelous Mini Lessons’ books are a ‘must have’ for your professional collection.  They are clear, practical, and filled with catchy phrases and easy-to-teach strategies.  Her latest book focuses on writing in the content areas and helping young students learn to write about subjects they care about.   Lori is moving to Vancouver from Toronto this summer so I look forward to seeing more of her and attending a few more of her dynamic presentations.

7. A Mindset for Learning –  Teaching the Traits of Joyful, Independent Growth – Kristine Mraz and Christine Hertz

I had the privilege of hearing one of the authors of this book present at the Reading for the Love of It conference in Toronto this past February and, of course, I bought a copy and got it signed like a groupie!  Based on Carole Dweck’s ground-breaking research around fixed and positive mindsets, these two teachers have developed practical strategies to help foster independent, compassionate caring students and to help them be more responsible for their own choices!  I love this book!

8. Multiple Paths to Literacy – Proven High-Yield Strategies to Scaffold Engaging Literacy Learning Across the Curriculum K-2  –  Miriam P. Trehearne   flag

Canadian consultant and author Miriam Trehearne new book for early primary teachers is definatetly going to get some ‘BUZZ’ starting.  This book is packed full of ideas that link to the new curriculum including: Inquiry, Play, Art, Technology, and Self-Regulation.  I appreciate that Miriam’s books are very practical with lessons you can use, student samples, and assessment tools.  K-2 teachers – take note!

9. Launch – Using Design Thinking To Boost Creativity and Bring Out the Maker in Every Student              John Spencer and A. J. Juliani

Love the title ‘LAUNCH’ and the fact that this book is all about creative thinking – another component to our new curriculum.  I really like clearly laid out books with a structure and process to share with students, along with a common language that can be integrated at every grade level.  ( Now if they only had a song… LOL!)
Here is the basic structure of the creative thinking outlined in the book:
Look, Listen, and Learn
Ask Lots of Questions
Understand the Problem or Process
Navigate Ideas
Create
Highlight What’s Working and Failing

1o.  IQ – A Practical Guide to Inquiry-Based Learning – Jennifer Watt and Jill Colyer

Attention all BC teachers who are looking for a book to help them launch the redesigned curriculum!  I love practical books and this one is I know I will use as we begin to shift into a more inquiry based approach to teaching and learning this fall.

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COMING SOON!!!!!

Powerful Readers Thinking Strategies to Guide Literacy Instruction in Secondary Classrooms

Kyla Hadden (and me!)  flag

I just couldn’t make a list of professional resources without a shameless plug for this book!  Kyla and I have been busy working on the edits – lots of work but the book is coming together so well.  I’m excited for it’s release and for Secondary teachers to get a first hand look at Reading Power strategies in action!  Three cheers for Kyla!

Thanks for stopping by!  What’s in your summer professional TBR pile?

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Filed under Professional Books, Reading Power

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? New Fairy Tales for the New Year

IMWAYR

It’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week. Check out more IMWAYR posts here: Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers

Happy New Year, everyone!  Over my winter break reading and book brousing, I noticed a number of recently released fairy tales. Some are original and some are re-telling of classics – but all are wonderful stories with gorgeous illustrations.   Whether I’m teaching and practicing Questioning or reading aloud for pleasure –  these would definitely be books I would recommend sharing with your students!

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Jack Frost – William Joyce

The third in Joyce’s Guardians of Childhood series, following The Man in the Moon and The Sandman, this is a charming and engaging story about the origin of Jack Frost.  Stunning illustrations.

Imelda and the Goblin King – Briony May Smith

Beautiful and inventive illustrations with a lovely story filled with humour sprinkled with subtle life lessons about bullying.  Complete with fairies, goblins, a Fairy Queen, this is a delightful, whimsical fairy tale.

The Tiger Who Would Be King – James Thurber

This book was on many “Best of 2015” lists last month, but I had not read it.  Now I know why!  This is an intense, rather dark fable about a tiger who wants to overthrow the lion as king and subsequently starts a war in the jungle. A thought-provoking book to spark discussion about war, pride and costs.  I could see reading this book for Remembrance Day and would definitely use it for questioning, inferring and transform.

Toby and the Ice Giants – Joe Willington

The Fox and the Star – Coralie Bickford-Smith

A sweet, magical story about the friendship between a fox and a star.  Gorgeous book – stunning illustrations, beautiful design – even the binding is lovely!  Simple enough for a beginning reader and would be an excellent read-aloud for a grade 2/3 class (it’s 64 pages).  Perfect book for questioning.  LOVE this one!

Winter’s Child – Angela McAllister

A delightful tale about a little boy who loves the winter.  When he befriends the “Winter” child, their friendship prolongs the cold months, delaying Spring’s arrival.  The world freezes, nothing grows, and the little boy’s grandmother is becoming sicker, eventually leading to the realization that the friendship needs to end.   Beautifully written and illustrated.

The Wild Swans – Jackie Morris

Exquisitely beautiful book. A wonderful lyrical version of Han’s Christian Anderson’s classic tale.  Jackie Morris – one of my favorite author/illustrators!

Vasalisa the Beautiful – A Russian Folktale – Anna Morgunova

Another retelling of a classic Russian fairy tale about a heroine who conquers the terrifying Baba Yaga with the help of her magical doll.  This would be more appreciated by older students.  Memorizing illustrations.

The Sleeper and the Spindle – Neil Gaiman

Captivating, dark and slightly twisted tale of Sleeping Beauty (with a sprinkling of Snow White)  told by the amazing Neil Gaiman – as only he can.  The detailed metallic illustrations by Chris Riddell are stunning.  This would be an excellent read-aloud for an intermediate class.  Ah-MAZING!  Great for Text-to-Text connections.

The Most Wonderful Thing in the World – Vivian French

Perfect text, perfect illustrations, and a perfect message that family is truly the most wonderful thing in the world. Lovely read-aloud for primary students.

Happy reading in 2016, everyone!

Thanks for stopping by!  Which Fairy Tale caught your eye?

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Filed under 2015 releases, Fairy Tales, New Books, Question, Reading Power

Top 10 Tuesday – Favorite Nonfiction Connect Books for Primary

top 10

It’s Top Ten Tuesday!  This week, I’m featuring my favorite Nonfiction “Connect” books!

When practicing “making connections” with your primary students, try alternating between fiction and nonfiction books so your students learn that we can connect to both stories and information.  When reading stories – we can make connections  to characters, feelings and events;  when reading information, we can make connections to background knowledge and experiences.  

Try using the “KNEW-NEW” connection after reading a nonfiction book to your class – “What was one fact from this book you already KNEW and one fact that was NEW information?”  Kids love the “KNEW-NEW”!

Here are my top 10 Nonfiction “CONNECT” books for Primary students…

  1.  The Handiest Things In the World – Andrew Clement

Connections to all the things our hands can do.

2.   With A Friend By Your Side – Barbara Kerley

Connections to the value of friendships all around the world.

Families Around the World – Margriet Ruurs

Connections to families and cultures.

3.   You and Me Together:  Mom, Dads, Kids Around the World – Barbara Kerley 

Connections to the strong bond between parent and child.  Stunning photographs!

4.  I, Fly:  the Buzz About Flies and How Awesome They Are – Bridget Haos

Connections to fly facts.

5. A Chicken Followed Me Home: Questions and Answers About a Familiar Fowl – Robin Page

Chicken connections!

6. Senses at the Seashore – Shelley Rotner

Connections to the sounds, smells and sights of the beach.

 7.  What in the World?  Numbers in Nature –  Nancy Raines Day

Connections to sets of numbers in the nature.

8.  Where Does Kitty Go in the Rain? – Harriet Ziefert

Connections to rain facts.

9.  Water Is Water Miranda Paul

Connections to the journey of water.

10.  Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt – Kate Messner

Connections to the hidden wonders in the garden.

What are your favorite Non-fiction books to teach and practice making connections?

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Filed under Nonfiction, Picture Book, Read-Aloud, Reading Power, Top 10 Tuesday