Category Archives: Reading Power

Adrienne’s OLLI – Online Learning Lesson Idea #20 – Thank You, Earth!

I originally created OLLIs when schools in my province of British Columbia shut down last spring due to Covid19.  While we are now back in class, I know there are many districts still juggling virtual and in-class support.  These OLLIs can be used both in class and virtually person.  Either way, I hope you find some ideas that you can use with your students to lighten your load just a little this year!  

Here is a list of the previous OLLI lessons and anchor books in case you missed any of them:

OLLI#1 (The Hike)

OLLI#2. (If I Could Build A School)

OLLIE#3  (Mother’s Day)

OLLI#4 (Everybody Needs a Rock)

OLLI #5 – (WANTED:  Criminals of the Animal Kingdom) 

OLLI #6 – (Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt)

OLLI #7 (All About Feelings – “Keep it! – Calm it! – Courage it!)  

OLLI #8 (I’m Talking DAD! – lesson for Father’s Day) 

OLLI #9 (Be Happy Right Now!) 

OLLI #10 – (Dusk Explorers)

OLLI#11 (If You Come to Earth)

OLLI #12 (Map of Good Memories)

OLLI #13 (Harvey Slumfenburger)

OLLI #14 (New Year’s Resolutions)

OLLI #15 ( 100 Things That Make Me Happy)

OLLIE #16 (Leaving Our Heartprints) 

OLLIE #17  (The Sounds of Snow)  (This post is temporarily unavailable)

OLLIE #18 – Celebrating Women Trail Blazers

OLLIE #19The Six Senses of Spring

THE INSPRIATION:

Earth Day is coming up this Thursday, so I thought it would be a great time to focus on extending our gratitude to Earth and all that it provides for us! It’s also a perfect topic to inspire some great writing!

THE ANCHOR:

Thank You, Earth: A Love Letter to Our Planet – April Pulley Sayre

YouTube Read Aloud HERE

While not a brand new book, this has been my “go to” book for Earth Day for many years. I love that the book is all about gratitude for all that the Earth gives us written in the form of a letter. Filled with stunning photography and lyrical rhythmic text makes it a perfect read-aloud.  The end notes provide suggestions for ways we can help the environment.  I also appreciated the detailed notes about the photographs – which are truly breath-taking.  Great anchor to inspire “Thank you, Earth” writing and poetry and great mentor text for teaching alliteration.

THE LESSON:

  • Ask students what special day is coming up on April 22nd. (Earth Day) Ask students “What is Earth Day”? “Why is Earth Day important?”
  • Explain that the Earth is an amazing planet, but it needs our help to protect it! Earth Day is a day when people all over the world celebrate the Earth and take part in activities to help make our world a happier, healthier place to live.
  • You may wish to brainstorm things that students could do this week to help the earth: turn off lights, turn off the water when brushing your teeth, recycle bottles and cans, pick up garbage, have a shorter shower, put your computer on “sleep” rather than on screen saver, bring re-usable containers for lunch, walk or ride a bike to school.
  • Remind the students that the Earth gives us so much, we all need to work together to try to protect it. Every day is Earth Day!
  • Ask: What are some of the things the Earth gives us? (water, air, trees, soil, animals, rocks, mountains, rivers, lakes, waterfalls, sunshine, clouds, plants, fruit, vegetables, etc.)
  • Tell the students that if a person gave them so many amazing things every day, you would probably be thanking them! Ask them when was the last time they said “Thank you” to the Earth? Explain that it might feel strange to say “Thank you” to earth because Earth can’t really hear us and it’s not really alive. But what if we could say thank you to Earth? What would you thank Earth for?
  • Show them the book “Thank You, Earth“. Tell them this book is someone saying thank you to the Earth for all that it gives us. Read or share the story on YouTube
  • Invite the students to share their favorite photograph or page.
  • Tell the students that you noticed even thought the book didn’t rhyme, there was a lovely sound and mood to some of the words when you read it out loud. Tell them you noticed several were several words that started with the same letter in the book. Explain that this is a technique writers sometimes use called “alliteration“. “Craggy caves” and “majestic mountains” are examples of alliteration because they are two words, close together, that start with the same sound.
  • Read the book again, and invite students to listen for the alliteration. (ie – slippery seaweed and stone; mountains and minerals; bills and bones) They can give a “thumbs up” whenever they hear similar sounds.
  • Tell the students that they are going to be writing “Thank you letters” to Earth, thanking it for all the amazing things. Tell them that you are going to think about using alliteration in your letter.
  • Model this during a “write aloud” Invite the students to help you with your alliteration.

Dear Earth,

Thank you for the tall trees and the green grass.

Thank you for tiny turtles and giant giraffes.

Thank you for red raspberries and green grapes.

Thank you for lakes to swim in and rivers to follow.

Thank you for whooshing waterfalls and cool caves.

  • Point out that you were trying to choose two things on each line that were connected in some way and also that you were trying to use alliteration. The alliteration makes the writing sound a bit like a poem, even though it doesn’t rhyme.
  • Talk about an ending that let’s your reader know you are at the end. Tell the students you want to try to include something about protecting the Earth at the end of your letter. Invite students to make suggestions for the ending. And don’t forget to sign your name!

Earth, you give us so much and never ask us for anything

But if you could talk, you might say, “Please take care of me!”

I will, Earth. I will!

Love, Ms. Gear

  • Students can do a Dear Earth draft in their Writer’s Notebook if you prefer.
  • When they are ready, they can write their letter on fancy paper, or use one of the POSTCARD templates below. Students can use one side of the Postcard to write their message and the other side to draw and color a picture of their favorite thing that Earth gives us (forest, mountains, ocean, gardens, etc.)

Postcard Template 1

Postcard Template 2 (no lines)

Postcard Template 3

Postcard Template 4

More Earth Day Anchor Books (some with YouTube links)

The week leading up to Earth Day is a great opportunity to share a range of wonderful picture books to help start conversations about the importance of doing our part to care for the earth.   While there are dozens to choose from, I have tried to highlight some old classics, new releases, and inspiring true stories.

Hello, Earth! – Poems to Our Planet – Joyce Sidman

Interview with Joyce Sidman as she talks about her book and reads some of her poems from this beautiful new book

HERE

My Friend Earth – Patricia MacLachlan

(YouTube read aloud HERE Note – start at 1.36 seconds)

A celebration of the natural world and an invitation for positive action for Planet Earth. Great opportunities to share life science concepts and amazing facts about the environment with children. Interactive text and lift the flap pictures. Patricia MacLachlan is one of my favorite authors!

If We Were Gone: Imagining the World Without People – John Co

YouTube Read aloud HERE

Is the Earth better off without us?  What has human impact done to our Earth? What a great question and one that will certainly stimulate some great discussion from your students.

Does Earth Feel? 14 Questions for Humans – Marc Majewski

Does Earth feel calm?
Does Earth feel curious?
Does Earth feel hurt?
Does Earth feel heard?

A stunning picture book that asks 14 critical questions to encourage deep thinking and discussion about our one and only planet.

Earth Day Every Day (Cloverleaf Books ™ — Planet Protectors) by [Lisa Bullard, Xin Zheng]

Earth Day Every Day – Lisa Bullard

(YouTube Read aloud HERE)

Not For Me, Please! I Choose to Act Green – Maria Godsey

YouTube Read Aloud HERE

One Earth – Eileen Spinelli

YouTube Read Aloud HERE

Lovely rhyming and counting book for younger readers. Readers can count reasons to love the planet and ways to protect it. Beautiful illustrations in this conservation-themed book.

The Earth Gives More – Sue Fliess

YouTube Read aloud – HERE

A lovely, rhyming story follows the change in seasons and illustrates how we can all be stewards of the Earth.

Our Big Home: An Earth Poem – Linda Glaser

Beautiful and inspiring.  Not only could you use this book for Earth Day but also for acceptance and inclusion – no matter who you are, what race or culture you come from – we all share this world and are responsible for its care.  This book is filled with joy and a sense of wonder at this “home” all humans share.

What A Waste – Trash, Recyling, and Protecting Our Planet – Jess French

10 Things I Can Do to Help My World – Melanie Walsh

I think that one challenge of teaching about Earth Day is helping kids know practical ways they can take care of the earth, besides doing garbage duty at school.  This book gives young readers clear examples of how they can help.  From turning off the water while brushing their teeth, to using both sides of the paper while drawing, kids will enjoy learning simple ways they can care for the environment.   I love the large size of this book, making it great for sharing.  It’s visually appealing and cleverly designed with flaps and includes clear, simple language.

My Green Day – Melanie Walsh

A companion to 10 Things I Can Do To Help My World, this book outlines through picture, simple sentences and colourful illustrations how we can all try to be more environmentally friendly in our every day activities.   Hidden pictures, flaps to lift and holes makes this a fun book for sharing and reading.

The Earth Book – Todd Parr

With simple language and his colorful signature illustrations, Todd Parr describes to young readers how they can do their part to help the environment.  Great concrete examples showing how we can all do our part to make a difference.  Use to inspire younger students create their own “Todd Parr” style Earth Day poster!

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What Does It Mean to Be Green?  – Rana DiOrio

A young boy and girl explore all the different ways they can be Green over the course of a day. They discover lots of amazing facts (like our food travels an average of 1,500 miles to be on our plate!)  I like how DiOrio takes the buzzword “green” and explains it clearly to children, giving them lots of ideas for being “green” themselves.

What Matters – Alison Hughes

Great new book for Earth Day!  This is a wonderful look at the ripple effect of how one small act – picking up garbage that isn’t yours – has repercussions to make the world cleaner and better. (Think Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed but for the earth!) I also think this book would be great for introducing the concept of the inter-connectedness of ecosystems.

The Curious Garden by Peter Brown

Liam is a curious boy living in a drab, gray city. One day, he finds a few dying plants growing through an old railroad track.  Liam waters and prunes the plants until they grow into a lush garden that overtakes the entire city.  By the end of the book, greenery covers the rooftops and pops up in the most unexpected places.  I LOVE this magical story and notice something new every time I read it.  If you haven’t shared this with your class yet – it’s a MUST read!

The Lorax – Dr. Seuss

“UNLESS someone like you
cares a whole awful lot,
nothing is going to get better.
It’s not!”

Way back in the 1960’s, long before “going green” was a mainstream concept, Dr. Seuss introduced young readers to the impacts of clear-cutting on the environment.  Written and illustrated in classic Dr. Seuss style, but this book focuses on more serious themes of consumerism, economics, deforestation, and the environment.  A great choice for older students that will stimulate some great discussions about environmental conservation.

The Wartville Wizard – Don Madden

This book was published in 1986 but its message will never be outdated.  A cranky old man who spends his days cleaning up the litter left by his fellow townspeople. One day he receives “the power over trash,” which gives him the ability to send the garbage right back where it came from! When the townspeople find their garbage stuck to them, they learn a valuable lesson. Great pictures, great story!  This book is lengthy so would make a great read-aloud for older students.  (Warning – references to cigar butts and beer cans.)

The Barefoot Book of Earth Tales – Dawn Casey

This is a gorgeous anthology of seven traditional tales from around the world, each one promoting a sustainable lifestyle and living green.  Readers learn about the ways that different cultures around the world try living in harmony with the rhythms and patterns of nature.  Included are suggested activities to go along with each story including creating a a song-line painting, cooking “anything-goes soup”, making a cornhusk doll, and growing your own tomatoes.   Love the link of Earth day and cultural diversity.

Thanks for stopping by! Please share this blog post with your teacher friends!

Happy Earth Day, everyone!

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Filed under Earth Day, environment, New Books, OLLI, Read-Aloud, Reading Power, Writing Strategies

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? Final Favorite Picture Books of 2019

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As 2019 comes to an end, I wanted to focus on some of the picture books that were released late in the year,  but that can’t be missed!    From books about friendship, family and traditions, to celebrating nature and special places – there is something here for everyone!

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The Scarecrow  – Beth Ferry

He never rests.
He never bends.
He’s never had a single friend,
for all the woodland creatures know
not to mess with old Scarecrow.

And so begins “The Scarecrow”, my favorite picture book of 2019.  So much to love about this gentle, heart-tugging picture book. With gorgeous artwork by the Tan Brothers (The Night Gardner) and gentle rhyming text by Beth Ferry, (Stick and Stone) readers are pulled into the wheat field where an old scarecrow has stood throughout the passing of many seasons. The local animals are naturally afraid of scarecrow and the excluded scarecrow has never known a friend. But being excluded from community doesn’t stop the scarecrow from showing kindness to an injured baby crow. And as the scarecrow cares for the baby bird and a relationship forms, the lonely scarecrow discovers purpose.
This book invites conversations about being kind to neighbors in need and that everyone is capable of loving and caring for each other no matter who they are. Will be adding this to my Powerful Understanding “OTHERS” book list! LOVE this book SO SO much!

The Cool Bean Jory John

“It seemed like there were two types of beans in the world. There were the cool beans and the beans like me.”  It’s hard when the beans you used to hang out with are now the Cool Beans and you’re just you.  It happens.  But it’s never easy.  (I made many connections to this one!)  This “too-cool-for-school” theme is the third picture book from the bestselling author of The Bad Seed and The Good Egg. 

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My Ocean is Blue – Darren LeBeuf

“My ocean splashes and crashes / and echoes and squawks. // My ocean laughs and hums.”  Love this joyful seaside romp in the follow up to My Forest is Green.  This book is filled with gorgeous paper cut illustrations and overflowing with literary techniques – similes, personification,  and amazing sensory details.  Great anchor for exploring nature, visualizing and descriptive writing.  Not a focus, but certainly noticed and appreciated the girl exploring the ocean has a physical disability.   Many reasons to add this book to your collection!

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Fly! – Mark Teague 

Delightful wordless picture book about a mama bird trying to convince her little one to learn to fly while the baby prefers having food brought to him.  Young readers will enjoy the humorous ideas the little bird has about alternatives to flying and parents will relate to the frustration of the mama bird!  Mark Teague’s illustrations perfectly capture the actions and expressions of a defiant toddler and frustrated parent.

The Love Letter – Anika Aldamuy Denise

This book is SO adorable, I can hardly stand it!  Hedgehog, Bunny and Squirrel find a love letter, and each one thinks it’s meant for them.  But where did it come from, and who is it for?  So sweet seeing how feeling special made a difference in the lives of all the animals.  Such a great read-aloud and a perfect new book for Valentine’s Day!

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Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao – Kat Zhang

Perseverance and family traditions are the themes in this delightful, colorful story.  This little girl is trying so hard to make the perfect bao as others in her family can do but she just can’t get it right.  Charming characters and great illustrations!  This would be a great book for talking about family and cultural traditions.

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Sulwe – Vashti Harrison

Sulwe is a little girl whose skin color is darker than anyone else in her family.  She tries to do anything she can to change the color of her skin, but nothing works.  Breathtaking illustrations with a positive message in self esteem and learning that true beauty comes from within.   This will be added to my Powerful Understanding “Self” book list and also a great anchor book for teaching similes!

The Favorite Book – Bethanie Deeney Murgula

This book was so much more than I expected.  While its central theme is “having favorites”, it focuses more on HOW we go about choosing them and what influences our choices.  LOTS to discuss here and would make a great read-aloud when teaching personal preferences.

Caspian Finds a Friend Jaqueline Veissid

Gentle, imaginative story about loneliness and the friendship that develops between a boy and a polar bear.  Absolutely gorgeous illustrations and heart-warming story.   I loved this one and will be adding it to my “Friendship” book list.

Seeds and Trees Brandon Walden

A beautiful fairy tale for older students with a wonderful message on the power of words!  We always have a choice—we can speak up-lifting, healing words, or we can speak words that are dark and full of despair and hate.  We also have a choice of what we do with the words that are spoken to us.  Powerful message, lots to discuss, and great for inferring theme.  Great book for “Action-Reaction” lesson!

The Map of Good Memories – Zuzanna Celej

When war forces Zoe and her family to leave their city, she draws a “map of good memories,” so that they will always be with her. A simple, effective refugee story and a great anchor for connecting and writing about “Special Places”.  I love the idea of having students create their own “Map of Good Memories”.

I Wonder K.A. Hale

What do clouds taste like? Do my toys miss me when I’m gone? How do clocks know what time it is? Do tires get tired? What are boy ladybugs called? Do trees dream?
A delightful celebration of wonderings and questions to ponder.  The illustrations are magical. A wonderful book to inspire students to think deeply and wonder about the world! LOVE this one!

The Hike – Alison Farrell

Layers of love for this book that celebrates hiking, adventures, friendship and the great outdoors.  It’s tender yet lively, poetic yet scientific, magical yet natural.  Three friends and their dog head to the woods for a hike.  As they wander the woods, they record their observations in a sketchbook.  I love how the lyrical text is woven with detailed labelled diagrams of all that the children observe on their hike.  This would be a wonderful anchor book for observing details in nature and descriptive writing.  I love hiking and I love this book!

Fairy Science – Ashley Spires

Anything by Ashley Spires is sure to be a winner.  This book introduces young readers to to the scientific method in an easy-to-understand way. There’s even a little experiment in the back for budding scientists to try.  Esther examines the fairy world with a critical eye and tries to explain natural phenomena using science.  A great anchor book for science, critical thinking and fairy fans everywhere!

The Serious Goose – Jimmy Kimmel

Late Night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel has written and illustrated this hilarious book aimed for the Pre-K and K readers.  This book will have readers giggling at this very serious goose who refuses to smile and the various attempts to make him do so.  Lots of fun and interaction with this one.

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Who Wet My Pants? Bob Shea

This book, while funny, includes many important themes that can stimulate connections and discussions:  embarrassment, blame, compassion, and forgiveness. Reuben the bear, while delivering donuts in the campgrounds discover that “someone” wet his pants.  And while he accuses his companions, one after another, of being the one responsible, his patient friends assure him that accidents can happen.  Very funny read-aloud and I really like how the friends show empathy rather than make Reuben feel worse by teasing him.

The Boring Book – Shinsuke Yoshitake

An interesting exploration of what it means to be bored.  We follow a young boy as he explores the how’s and why’s of being bored and eventually develops a new understanding – being bored is a choice.  Great illustrations.  For those familiar with my “One Word” activity for transform, this would be a great anchor book for that lesson, using the word “bored”.

Stretchy McHandsome – Judy Schachner

How can you not love a book called “Stretchy McHandsome”?  How can you not love a cat with the same name?  This delightful book is about the youngest of nine cats who sets out from his cardboard box to explore the world and meets a stretchy friend.  For cat lovers everywhere – but you don’t have to love cats to fall in love with Stretchy McHandsome!

 

Thanks for stopping by!  Hope you found one or two new books to add to your classroom or library collections!  This will be my last post of 2019.

Happy Reading and see you in the 2020!

 

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Filed under 2019 releases, New Books, Picture Book, Powerful Understanding, Reading Power

Picture Book 10 for 10 (2019) – New Books for Your Reading Power Collection

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I’m excited to be, once again, participating in this summer’s 10 for 10 Picture Book celebration! #pb10for10   This annual celebration of picture books is hosted by Cathy from Reflect and Refine: Building a Learning Community and Mandy from Enjoy and Embrace Learning.  Hard to believe this is my seventh year of participating in this event! (you can read my 2018 here,  2017 post here,  2016 post here2015 post here2014 post here and 2013 here. )  Each year, the blogging community chooses 10 picture books on a range of themes – from diversity, to community building, to writing, to conservation.  It is an amazing opportunity to explore new picture books related to a wide range of themes.  (It can also be a little hard on your bank account, if you are anything like me!)

Keeping with tradition, I have organized my #pb10fo10 post to feature new releases that support Reading Power strategies.  I have included two books for each: Connecting, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, and Transform (synthesizing).   For those who are already using RP, these would be my recommendations for adding or replenishing your collection this year!

CONNECT

Where Are You From?  – Yamile Saied Mendez

When looking for Connect books, I am now drawn to books that can also double for anchors for my Powerful Understanding lessons.  This is a beautiful book for making connections and exploring identity.   We journey with a little girl, Abuelo, as she explores the important question, “Where are you from?”  Gorgeous illustrations, this book is heartwarming, uplifting, and important.  A perfect anchor book to launch an exploration of family, culture and identity.  LOVE!

Remarkably You Pat Zieltow Miller

I was so excited to share this new book by the author of Be Kind,  one of my favorite books from last year.  I would definitely use this book for making connections with early primary students, as well as it being a great anchor for exploring self identity and making a difference.  I love how the author encourages children to use their talents to do good things in the world.  Whatever their personalities, whatever their interests: “Don’t sit on the sidelines. / Be part of the fray. / Go after your passions a little each day. / Find what needs fixing. / Repair what you can. / Then choose a new problem and do it again.”   

VISUALIZE

Run Wild – David Covell

This book celebrates the freedom and fun of running wild and free in the great outdoors.  With rhyming text, we run with two children through a variety of “wilds” – from cool forests to hot sandy beaches.  I love the energy and spirit of this book and the playful language is perfect for reading aloud and practicing visualizing.

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My Forest is Green – Darren Lebeuf

This book follows a nature-loving boy as he keenly observes and explores “his forest” and uses different artistic techniques to record them.  I love how this book combines excellent information about woodlands with an appreciation of nature, art, and imagination.  This book is filled with descriptive language and would be an excellent anchor book for sensory writing and using descriptive adjectives.

QUESTION

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Why? – Laura Vaccaro Seeger

I like books centered around curious characters to promote the power of asking questions.  In this new book by a favorite author of mine,  two friends spend time together through spring, summer, and into fall.  Rabbit persistently and simply asks Bear, “Why?”   Bear patiently answers over and over until there’s a question he has no answer for.  I so love the simplicity of the story but the emotional impact it left was surprising.  Perhaps it was the hugely expressive characters, curious rabbit and patient bear, interacting so beautifully together.  I also loved how there is room for the reader to infer what question the rabbit is exactly asking.  

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Lubna and Pebble – Wendy Medour

Wow.  This beautiful and heartbreaking story of refugees brought tears to my eyes many times.  Lubna and her father have come to a refugee camp. As they arrive, Lubna finds a smooth pebble that becomes her closest friend (think  Tom Hank’s “Wilson” in Cast Away).  This is a such an important story and a perfect book to open up a discussion with younger students as to why immigration is so important and why so many people “choose” to leave their homes.  There were lots of unknowns that leave the reader wondering –Where is the rest of Lubna’s family? Why doesn’t Lubna have a real doll? “What happened in the war?” “Where is Lubna’s home?” “What will happen to Amir?   The illustrations are gorgeous and fill the pages with emotion.  This is a MUST HAVE book for your school library.

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Camp Tiger – Susan Choi

Okay, I cheated a little here and added a third QUESTION book, but I just couldn’t leave this wild and wondrous book off my list!  I love books that don’t tell the reader everything – and this one leaves us wondering all the way through.  With just a perfect blend of realism and fantasy, this coming of age story focuses on a little boy who goes camping with his family one summer.  Out of nowhere, a tiger walks out of the woods, starts talking, and ends up joining them on their camping trip.  Weird?  Yes, a little.  Did I completely understand why the tiger was there?  No.  Did it matter? NO!  It left me with so many unanswered questions and I was completely hooked.  Absolutely stunning illustrations!  I can’t wait to do a Question lesson with this book!

INFER

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A Stone Sat Still – Brendan Wenzel

Like many other readers, I adored Brendan Wenzal’s previous picture books They All Saw a Cat and Hello Hello.   In this new book, he explores perspective again, this time focusing on a stone and how it means different things to different creatures, depending on their perspective.  For some of it, it’s quite large, but for others, they are overwhelmed by it’s size.    Stunning mix of cut paper, pencil, collage, and paint illustrations and a gentle,  meditative rhythm in the text.   While seemingly simple, it invites readers to infer their own ideas about perspective, home, and the environment.  

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Carl and the Meaning of Life – Deborah Freedman

I fell in love with Carl when I first read this book.  He asks deep-thinking questions about the meaning of life and sets out on a search to find his true purpose. And what he discovers is that he, like all living things, is connected to an ecosystem and, while small, plays an integral part. Can you say adorable illustrations? Can you say science lessons? Can you say making a difference? I was debating whether to list this for Transform, but decided it fit well with Inferring because the message is subtle and invites readers to question and infer – How are we all connected? What is our job here on Earth? Why do we do the things we do? Who do we do them for?

TRANSFORM

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Say Something! – Peter H. Reynolds

I LOVE this book by the great Peter H. Reynolds and have shared it many times since it was released last spring.  This simple book packs a lot of power, encouraging readers to use their voice to make a difference. What I liked is how Reynolds shows different ways of “saying” something – with words, with kindness, with creativity.  This book is a great anchor to launch a unit on global stewardship.

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All the Ways to be Smart – Denise Bell

One word activity – “Smart”!  This book will help transform young readers thinking about what it means to be smart, celebrating different forms of “smartness” and talents children bring to the world.  “Smart is not just ticks and crosses, smart is building boats from boxes. Painting patterns, wheeling wagons, being mermaids, riding dragons.”  This book is as important as it is delightful.

My Heart – Corinna Luyken

Yes, I know, I cheated again and added a third book for Transform but this book is a must share book for teachers.  An ode to the strength of our hearts, this book transforms our thinking about love and self-acceptance.  Focusing on the “one word” activity using the word “heart”, I believe we would see many “transformed thoughts” about our hearts after reading this book.  Simple text and a soft pallet of illustrations. I like how the author uses light and dark to show the different feelings of the heart. There are also hidden hearts found within the illustrations.  I would recommend this book for older students as well as younger ones.

And there you have it!  My #pb10for10 selections for 2019!  Thanks for stopping by and hope a title or two have caught your eye!  Happy reading and thinking, everyone!

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Filed under 2019 releases, Connect, Identity, immigration, Infer, New Books, Picture Book 10 for 10, Question, Reading Power, Refugee, Transform, Visualize

Picture Book 10 for 10 (2018) – 10 New Picture Books for Your Reading Power Collection!

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I’m excited to be, once again, participating in this summer’s 10 for 10 Picture Book celebration! #pb10for10   This annual celebration of picture books is hosted by Cathy from Reflect and Refine: Building a Learning Community and Mandy from Enjoy and Embrace Learning.  Hard to believe this is my sixth year of participating in this event! (you can read my  2017 post here,  2016 post here2015 post here2014 post here and 2013 here. )  Each year, the blogging community chooses 10 picture books on a range of themes – from diversity, to community building, to writing, to conservation.  It is an amazing opportunity to explore new picture books related to a wide range of themes.  (It can also be a little hard on your bank account, if you are anything like me!)

Keeping with tradition, I have organized my post to feature new releases that support Reading Power strategies.  I have included two books for each: Connecting, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, and Transform (synthesizing).   For those who are already using RP, these would be my recommendations for adding or replenishing your collection this year!

CONNECT

Quiet Please, Owen McPhee! Trudy Ludwig

From the amazing team who brought us “The Invisible Boy”, Trudy Ludwig and Patrice Barton’s new book “Quiet Please, Owen McPhee!” is a must have for a first week read-aloud to help build your classroom community. Owen McPhee loves to talk… and talk and talk and talk! (connections, anyone?) But when he develops laryngitis one day, he discovers the the value of being a good listener. Wonderful depiction of the social dynamics of a busy classroom with a gentle message about the importance of listening. LOVE!

Alma – And How She Got Her Name –  Juana Martinez-Neal.

Who named you?  What does your name mean?  What connection does your name have to your family?  These are questions I love to ask my students as we explore identity  (and the first lesson in my Powerful Understanding book!) Alma has six names – each one connected to people in her family.   A perfect connect book for a lesson on exploring our names.

QUESTION

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The Stuff of Stars – Marion Dane Bauer

Wow.  This stunning picture book (release date – Sept. 4th) presents readers with factual events about the birth of the universe, planet Earth, and life on Earth.  Expressive, lyrical free verse with magical, mesmorizing illustrations.  This would be an amazing book to explore and promote questions about how Earth began.  I love how the story parallels the birth of the Earth with the birth of a child. An amazing blend of science and art — and how we are all the stuff of stars.  Wow, again.

My Wounded Island Jacques Pasquet

This book, originally published in French, is a heartbreaking story of a northern island slowly disappearing into the sea.  But why?  A great book for questioning that introduces the new concept of “climate refugees” to young readers (and to me!) Beautifully written and gorgeously illustrated. Would make an excellent introduction to a unit on climate change or northern indigenous cultures. I also like the use of metaphor:”the beast” in the story is actually global warming.  ( I cheated just a little with this book as it was actually published in 2017 but I didn’t discover it until 2018!) 

VISUALIZE

 Tiny Perfect Things – M. H. Clark

A child and a grandfather walk around the neighborhood and share the wonder around them as they discover all sorts of tiny, perfect things together.  A celebration of childhood curiosity, adventure, and wonder in everyday things.  Rhyming text and detailed illustrations.  Love this one.  

Hello, Lighthouse – Sophie Blackall

This beautifully illustrated children’s picture book traces the daily life of a lighthouse keeper and his wife in a lighthouse on a very tiny island in the middle of the sea. Seasons pass, wind blows, fog rolls in, icebergs drift by…. all unfolding with beautiful language and vivid details – perfect for visualizing.

INFER

We are All Dots:  A Big Plan for a Better World –  Giancarlo Macrì

If you attended any of my workshops this past spring, you will have heard me going on and on about this amazing, powerful picture book that introduces, in simple format, many important social issues.  Intended for an older audience, this book would stimulate great discussions about equality and diversity with older students.   SO many inferences can be made from the many different dot images.  This is one of my favorite books of 2018.

Whale in a Fishbowl Troy Howell, Richard Jones

While on the surface, this is a gentle story of Wednesday – a whale who lives in a giant fishbowl in the middle of the city but yearns for a life beyond her bowl.  But metaphorically, it is a universal story of belonging, about possibilities, and finding one’s perfect place.  Stunning illustrations.   SO many inferences can be drawn from this story – from following your heart, believing in your dreams, having the courage to explore the unknown, animals in captivity… the list goes on!

TRANSFORM

All Are Welcome – Alexandra Penfold

Oh my.   This book.  It’s a must read for every teacher to share in the first days or week of school.  A wonderful, welcoming picture book that celebrates diversity, inclusiveness, acceptance, and celebration of all cultures in a school community.   I hope this book ends up in EVERY library in EVERY school EVERYWHERE!  If you are familiar with my “One Word” transform lesson – the one word I would use with this book is, of course, “Welcome”.

The Day You Begin – Jacqueline Woodson

“There will be times when you walk into a room and no one there is quite like you.”  And so begins this poignant, powerful story by the amazing Jacqueline Woodson (Each Kindness, The Other Side, Brown Girl Dreaming).  If there is only ONE book you read this summer – this is it.  This is a must-own book for teachers,  librarians, and parents, and a must-share for all kids, no matter their ages.  I am absolutely in love with this story of pride in self, fear of not fitting in, and ultimately belonging.   A PERFECT book for sharing at the beginning of the school year to help build a welcoming community in your classroom and a perfect reminder that we are more alike than different.  Possibly my favorite book of 2018 so far – release date is August 28 so pre-order now!

Thanks for stopping by!

Don’t forget to check out more 10 for 10 Picture Books!  #pb10for10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under 2018 releases, Connect, Infer, New Books, Picture Book 10 for 10, Question, Reading Power, Transform, Visualize

Guest Post #4 – Reading Power in China by Jennifer Gardner

I am pleased to welcome Jennifer Gardner, extraordinary teacher, administrator, teacher-leader and best of all, my friend!  Although we don’t see each other often, we have a strong “connection” and share a deep passion for teaching, learning and BOOKS! We first met over 10 years ago in Vernon when I was presenting a Reading Power workshop there.  Jennifer embraced Reading Power and it became her school focus for many years.  She is now bringing “deep thinking” to Maple Leaf School in Dalian, China. Welcome, Jennifer!

I met Adrienne in 2005 when I was working as a Literacy Lead Teacher with SD#22 (Vernon). When I attended her Reading Power workshop and realized that her work was based on solid research in a very useable format, I was convinced that this work needed to be adopted and used!! And so began my journey with Reading Power.  Over the next 7 years, Adrienne continued to write books and give workshops. I became a principal and worked with incredible teachers to improve reading in my school. Throughout these years, Adrienne and I have continued our ‘book bond’ – a bond that is focused on supporting teachers, as they teach comprehension in a visible and explicit way.

In 2014, my husband and I moved to Dalian, China to work with Maple Leaf International School System. I was hired to improve reading comprehension skills in a Middle School with 1200 students. I had 30 ESL Bilingual teachers who began this journey with me. It was an incredible journey as I introduced Reading Power as a way to help students ‘think’ in English, while they are reading. These students go from a predominantly Chinese school (10 classes per week of English instruction) to full time English in grade 10 with BC Curriculum and BC teachers! The challenge was to help these bilingual teachers understand the difference between “rote learning of vocabulary and grammar” versus “thinking about what they are reading” in English.

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I started with having the Grade 7 students create a Chinese version of the Reading Power poster so that we could add ‘brain parts’ to show the ‘thinking ‘ the students needed to do to make sense of the text. Several students created posters – notice the students in the posters are wearing their Maple Leaf uniforms.

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How fun was that! I met with teachers weekly to go over the Reading Power lesson and to model, for them, how we need to help children think. Since good English pictures books were hard to come from, I created ppt’s with picture books I brought from Canada. In this way, I could use 1 picture book in 27 classrooms!  The bilingual teachers loved the support, they could add personal pictures or stories to the ppts and every week I went into classrooms to support them and help them navigate their way. In the course of one year, we introduced Connecting, Questioning and Inferring in an explicit and fun way. The students loved stories like Mean Jean, Courage, Miss Nelson is Missing, Willy the Champ, Yo?Yah!, Good Dog Carl, No!David to name a few. Finding great books for Chinese Middle School boys (with limited English) was my challenge. However, the students cheered whenever we would have a Reading Power lesson. (That was a good sign).

After that one year I returned to Canada to care for my father. To my delight, Reading Power continued on with the Bilingual teachers at the Middle School.  They continued because they noticed that the students were engaged and eager to learn English.

Now, this year, I have returned to China to take on the role of Professional Developer for Literacy Improvement for the ESL Department – 18 different cities, with 32 ESL Directors. Our focus will be Reading Power and Writing Power, K-9. We just finished 3 intensive days of sessions involving ‘changing the way we teach English to improve literacy’. Reading Power is a big part of this change – system wide.

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It is such a privilege to work with these ESL Directors, teachers, and students. They are eager to learn and are so respectful of the support they are receiving. I am impressed with their work ethic and their willingness to teach in a way that supports students’ learning!

Having Adrienne as my colleague and friend, has been a tremendous support. Her work is finding its way across oceans and continents!  Reading Power is now being translated into Mandarin! Thumbs up!!

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RP Chinese (2)

pic for Bio (2)

Jennifer Gardner

Contact info:

 

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Guest Post #3 – Reading Power in Tanzania by Ashley Aaoki

I am happy to welcome Ashley Aaoki as my third guest blogger.  Ashley is a beginning teacher in SD 67 in beautiful Okanagan.  She is passionate about teaching and about sharing her love of learning to students and teachers in all corners of the globe.  In this post, she shares her extraordinary and inspiring journey from her childhood days of “playing teacher” to bringing the joy of reading, writing, and learning to students and teachers in an orphanage and school in Arusha, Tanzania (Africa).

“Stand against the grain, get a purpose in your heart and ask yourself , “What can my life do?'” – Benjamin Cole Brown

Education has always been at my heart center. I can recall memories of the young(er) Ashley standing in front of the chalkboard, which perfectly hung in our playroom, assigning spelling tests and math quizzes to my little sister – she was naive and I was bossy! Evolving from that heart center laid another passion: traveling, but not any “type” of travel. I wanted to have authentic conversations with the local people, work alongside children who (just like my students) dreamed, laughed, and cried, and learn about what (extra)ordinary people face every single day. On a single piece of paper I wrote, “travel to Africa”. It was a dream placed in my heart and I kept it there for a long time. That was until the summer of 2016 when the dream in my heart and reality met.

Last year I had the privilege to travel as a teacher chaperone to Arusha, Tanzania. I had just closed the door on my first year of teaching and was coming off an emotional high. For a year I had been planning, preparing, and dreaming about my exciting journey ahead to bring twenty students and three teacher chaperones (I was one of the chaperones) to Tanzania, Africa.  We dedicated four labour intensive workweeks in an Orphanage/School located in the slums of Arusha. The work was challenging, the conversations I with those at the orphanage broke, yet it also captured my heart. Every. Single. Piece. Maybe it was the conversations I had with the children just like the ones my mom would have had with me as a child, “You are so loved, valuable, beautiful, and worthy!”, or maybe it was sitting on the rocky orphanage floor reading to the children just like my dad would have read to my sister and I at night. It might have been every moment, big or small. Whatever it was, I knew I needed to return and give more of myself.

When I signed up for the second trip, I spent a lot of time thinking about the skills I had and what I could offer, specifically to the teachers at the orphanage. Several conversations had been exchanged during the previous summer about professional development, which sparked the teachers curiosity; simply because professional development was beyond anything they had experienced before. I knew that collaboration, especially in this capacity could make a significant difference. I just didn’t know quite how.

Shortly after spring break had concluded (and a conversation was had with one of my colleagues and fellow chaperones) I had a vision of offering a reading and writing workshop for the teachers. There were many unanswered questions I had: How do I (a second year, 23 year old teacher) offer a workshop to teachers?  Do I really know what I’m doing?  What should I teach them?  But I knew that if I asked the “right” people, there could be support given. I began by asking a mentor of mine for ideas and suggestions.   At that point, she suggested I contact Adrienne Gear.  Now, I have a small confession to make: Adrienne is essentially a celebrity in my teaching life.  Not only was Adrienne a teaching celebrity, I also used all of her books in my classroom during my first year of teaching (Reading Power and Writing Power – fiction and nonfiction), proudly displayed the Reading Power Poster on the chalkboard; had attended every workshop or presentation she had given in our area, and reviewed her blog weekly for book recommendations for the classroom. I knew how powerful her books had been for me, as a beginning teacher, in providing a focused direction, plan, and process for teaching my students in both reading and writing. At times (especially during my first year of teaching) I would feel so overwhelmed with the tasks of teaching my students how to read and write and I found myself cherry picking from a variety of sites – including Pinterest.  I felt myself often existing at a crossroads between the “let’s make cute anchor charts that we’ll use once because we can’t remember what its purpose was” and progressing my students along as individuals who could be effective, capable, imaginative readers and writers. The problem wasn’t my students –  it was my lack of direction, failed processes, and confusing plans. But Adrienne’s books were straight forward and transformed my teaching and I dreamed of the endless possibilities of sharing these ideas with the teachers in Tanzania.

And so I tried to be “cool” (inside I was NOT!) and contacted Adrienne directly.  Following a couple of email exchanges, she told me that she would be more than willing to support the workshop by providing a list of anchor books that I might choose from as well as offering to donate some books for the teachers.  (cue Ashley celebrating and dancing like she’s 5 at a birthday party shortly after having cake!). She contacted her publisher at Pembroke, Mary Macchiusi, and together they donated 20 books – ten Reading Power and ten Writing Power books – to give to the teachers.  I spent several weeks carefully selecting the activities and information I was to share. Anchor charts were made with my neatest elementary teacher printing, and several books were purchased (thanks to several fundraising projects that happened within our district and my school). I packed up all of the items ready to be placed on the planes and felt as prepared as I possibly could. This would be a complete surprise for the teachers, and my excitement was building!

On one of our first days at the orphanage my colleague gathered all of the teachers and asked me to share the news. I can distinctly remember one teacher looking up at the sky and thanking God for me. The excitement shared amongst the teachers was palpable and I mentioned to them that I wished I could have bottled it up and saved the excitement for times in my life when I needed it. Throughout the weeks that followed (before the workshop) the teachers would seek me out on the worksite and share their excitement “oh, Ashley we cannot wait for you to teach us.”

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Teacher Justin arrived one hour before the workshops schedule beginning time. He could hardly wait! Along with teaching the most vulnerable children in Arusha’s slums, Justin is the schools social worker representative. This means he completes home visits on a regular basis encouraging young boys and girls to go back to school.

 

On the day of the workshop, I lined up the newly purchased picture books and novels, placed the Reading and Writing Power Books in front of each seat with a duotang filled with resources, a pen, and a highlighter. Some teachers, eager to begin, arrived an hour early! We began walking our way through the components of the Reading Power book, and (taking a page out of Adrienne’s “book” on how to present) I presented lessons that I had completed in my classroom.

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Ten teachers and the Headmaster joined me in a day of learning and growing – together!

 

The teachers were provided time to ask questions and while some were nervous each question gave me more insight into what teaching is like at the orphanage, and in Tanzania. Some of the comments shared included:

“I’m wondering how I teach this process to children with disabilities?”

This comment struck me as individuals who are disabled in Arusha are considered an inconvenience. They are often the poorest people as many don’t see employ ability for them as an option. My response to her was a Swahili term “polle, polle” (slowly, slowly). That great things can happen to those that take their time.

Following this comment another teacher placed his hand up and said:

“I’m wondering if this process will change my students personalities?”

Caught slightly off guard, I looked at this teacher and said: “No Edward, this won’t change your students. But it will give you insight into who your students are as people.”

 The workshop ended with one of the teachers (who I absolutely adore) stating the following:

“I don’t know if you know this Ashley, but Tanzanian culture does not recognize reading as a common practice. Books are incredibly expensive and when people do read it’s for the comics in our local newspaper. Before this workshop I looked at these picture books here and thought ‘what do these teach my pupils? What purpose do they have?’ Now, I see that my pupils can learn about things that I’m trying to teach on my own. Lessons like helping one another out or realizing it’s okay to not be perfect. So, thank you. Thank you!”

As the teachers left following a remarkable workshop each one thanked me several times and many hugs were exchanged. Some were showing me they were connecting (using the Gear hand signal) and one even sought me out days later and spent time regurgitating as much information that he learnt as possible.

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The teachers were unbelievably PROUD to be holding their new Reading and Writing Power books. I was PROUD of them for demonstrating both growth and vulnerability throughout the day of learning!

 

I cannot express in words how thankful I am to both Adrienne Gear and Mary Macchiusi at Pembroke Publishing for their support in making this workshop a possibility. The books were provided to the teachers as a result of their generous hearts (and donations). This was a truly magical day for the teachers and me. For a group of teachers, their eyes were opened to the possibilities that books (and reading) have in a classroom setting; the teachers reflected on what they had learned and were thrilled to implement new ideas into their classroom; and the director recognized how revolutionary this particular learning development was for a group who had (up until that point) never participated in professional development.

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Following the workshop presentation, I completed a Reading Power Lesson with these students. We discussed what connecting was, and practiced connecting while listening to a culturally relevant picture book “Rain School” by James Rumford. The students also practiced reading to themselves. The library was filled with the sound of silence as the students opened up the wonders found in a great book!

 

On our final day at the Orphanage, as our students were saying their farewells with the children that quickly became “theirs”, I made a point of connecting with one teacher (Justin). He held my hand and thanked me again for teaching him. Just before I left he said, “Before you arrived,  Ashley, the teachers were very sad. This work is hard, and it was like a grey cloud was sitting over us. When you taught us, you lifted us up. You lifted up our spirits and gave us hope. Just like the sun”. I looked at him and said, “That’s what life is about. We lift each other up, hold one another’s hands and walk together”.

This type of work has been my cause, allowed me to stand against the grain, and has reminded me how important the question “What can my life do?”  is.  I know that I have just started but will continue to find the answer.

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Ashley Aoki was born, raised, and is currently living and working in the beautiful Okanagan Valley working (School District #67) where she will begin her third year of teaching this fall.   Traveling to other countries has been an integral part of her life and teaching practice.  Her passion is teaching her students about global issues and encouraging them to participate in activities that make a difference in the school, local, or global community. This past year, the students in her school (and previous school) raised over $1500.00 to support the students and teachers at the Arusha Orphanage including new picture books, novels, school supplies, land shoes.  She considers herself a teacher/humanitarian, and recognizes the significant role education has on a global scale, seeing it as one of the key components that pulls individuals out of poverty.

You can leave a comment for Ashley below or contact her directly at: aaoki@summer.com

 

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Picture Book 10 for 10 (2017) – 10 New Picture Books for Your Reading Power Collection!

 

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I’m excited to be, once again, participating in this summer’s 10 for 10 Picture Book celebration! #pb10for10   This annual celebration of picture books is hosted by Cathy from Reflect and Refine: Building a Learning Community and Mandy from Enjoy and Embrace Learning.  Hard to believe this is my fifth year of participating in this event! (you can read my 2016 post here2015 post here2014 post here and 2013 here. )  Each year, the blogging community chooses 10 picture books on a range of themes – from diversity, to bullying, to writing, to conservation.  It is an amazing opportunity to explore new picture books related to a wide range of themes.  (It can also be a little hard on your bank account, if you are anything like me!)

This year, as with my previous 10 for 10 posts, I have organized my post to feature new releases that support Reading Power strategies.  I have included two books for each: Connecting, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, and Transform (synthesizing).  The response has been positive each year, so I am continuing the tradition!  For those who are already using RP, these would be my recommendations for adding or replenishing your collection this year!

(Please note that I have received advanced copies of a few of these titles so some might only be available for pre-order.)

CONNECT

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Now Antoinette Portis

This is a beautiful new book from Canadian writer/illustrator Antoinette Portis. Such a sweet story about a girl whose favorite things are whatever she’s currently experiencing. I would definitely use this with for connecting to favorite things (personal preferences),  but could also be used for inferring a deeper meaning about living in the moment.  Great for mindfulness and gratitude.

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There Might Be Lobsters – Carolyn Crimi

This is a wonderful story about dealing with fears and anxiety. Sukie is a very small dog with a really big fear of almost everything, especially lobster.  Spending a day at the beach with her favorite person is a nightmare for Sukie as she thinks about all the dangers that might be there.  When her favorite toy, “Chunka Munka” (love the name!) starts to drift into the tide, Sukie must face her fears!  I love that this book is told from the dog’s perspective and also you need to read it out loud just so you can say “Chunka Munka” lots of times!  Great illustrations!

QUESTION

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Questions AskedJostein Gaarder

Well, you can’t get a better book for introducing deep-thinking questions to your class than a book filled with them!  This book introduces readers to rather complex philosophical questions in a simple format.  Gorgeous,  soft-pallet paintings that capture the emotions of this little boy wandering and pondering through an open landscape.  This would be more suited for older students and would stimulate deep-thinking conversations.

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Mr. Benjamin’s Suitcase of SecretsPei-Yu Chang

What could be in his suitcase? This is the question readers wonder as they read this historical picture book based on the life and persecution Walter Benjamin – a Jewish philosopher forced to flee the Nazi occupied Germany during WWII.   When asked why he couldn’t just leave the suitcase behind, he responds:  “The contents of this case can change everything.”   But in the end, we never know what was inside – the perfect starting point for discussing possibilities. Such an important story depicting a world where ideas and opposition are seen as dangerous by those in power.  This is a book I would definitely recommend for units on WWII with intermediate or middle school. Incredible paper cut and mixed media illustrations.

VISUALIZE

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A River – Marc Martin

Oooooo… this book is stunning!  Gorgeous illustrations, detailed poetic text.. this book is a magical journey of a young girl in a silver boat following a river through jungles, farmland and eventually the sea.   But I think it could also be a wonderful introduction to the geography of rivers and their tributaries and habitats.    A marvelous, gentle journey to visualize!

Things to Do – Elaine Magliaro

This is a delightful book, perfect for visualizing but could also be used for making connections and an anchor book for “How To”  writing.  Reads like a collection of “How To” poems centered around a child’s day, capturing little things in life as well as different weather and seasons. Lovely vocabulary (great triple scoops!) and gorgeous illustrations.  This book is pure joy!  LOVE this one!

INFER

Draw the Line – Kathryn Otoshi

The amazing Katheryn Otoshi (author of One, Two, and Zero) has, once again, given us a book filled with rich discussion points.  Draw the Line is so much more than a book about lines.  It is a beautiful wordless picture book about friendship, creativity, community, conflict, resolution – and a “line” connecting us all.  A must have book for inferring, connecting, transform…. Brilliant!

Town is By the Sea – Joanne Schwartz

A simple, poetic story set in the early 1900’s in Cape Bretton, Nova Scotia tells of the challenging life of a mining family.  A young boy goes about his daily activities in the sunshine by the sea while, in contrast, his father works underground in the mines.  The writing is so beautifully descriptive and would be a great anchor book for descriptive, sensory writing or Visualizing, but also Inferring.  The words are lulling and almost haunting and the illustrations are gorgeous.

TRANSFORM

Life – Cynthia Rylant

Cynthia Rylant is definitely one of my top favorite children’s writers. I find her books to be so life-affirming, full of wonder and hope. Her new book “Life” is simply stunning. “What do you love about life?” is the question asked to many different animals. Through their responses, we are gifted with a wonderful message about life: how it constantly changes, the beauty of it, the darkness, and the wonders all around it. Simple, lyrical text and beautiful illustrations by Brendan Wenzel – it is a calm and reassuring book.  I would use the “one word” activity for this book with the word “Life”.  Give the word to the students before and after reading and see how their thinking changes.   Love.

Why Am I Me? – Paige Britt

This gorgeous book celebrates diversity and identity in the most respectful and thoughtful while exploring the deep question – Why am I me?  Would be great for both young children but would stimulate great discussions and writing responses from an older class.  A great “Me to We” book as readers are invited to imagine a world where there is no you or me, only we.

La La La: A Story of Hope – Kate DiCamillo

Just had to include this almost wordless picture book by the great Kate DiCamillo that tells the story of a lonely young girl who is longing to be heard.  The illustrations are endearing, gentle and filled with emotion.  This book invites inferences because of the sparse text, connections to being lonely and the desire to belong, and transforming because of the hopefulness that you feel.  As I always say – I know when a book is good when I don’t know where to put it!  And here is a perfect example of that!

 

There you have it!  My 2017 Picture Book 10 for 10!  Thanks for stopping by and I hope you found one or two books to add to your Reading Power collection!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under 2017 releases, Connect, Infer, New Books, Picture Book 10 for 10, Reading Power, Transform, Visualize

Ten for Ten 2016: Top 10 New Picture Books for Your Reading Power Collection

This annual summer celebration of picture books is hosted by Cathy from Reflect and Refine: Building a Learning Community and Mandy from Enjoy and Embrace Learning. This is my forth year of participating in this event – you can read my 2015 post here2014 post here and 2013 here.   Each year, the blogging community chooses 10 picture books on a range of themes – from diversity, to bullying, to writing, to conservation.  For the past 3 years, I have organized my 10 for 10 post around Reading Power – featuring two new releases for each RP strategy: Connecting, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, and Transform (synthesizing).  The response has been positive each year, so I am continuing the tradition!  For those who are already using RP, these would be my recommendations for adding or replenishing your collection this year!

CONNECT

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 Thunder Boy Jr. – Sherman Alexie

Connecting to names, origin of names, father-son relationships and family.  I love the voice in this delightful book.  Gorgeous illustrations and perfect for your aboriginal collection as well.

2. The Class – Boni Ashburn

Follow 20 different students from 19 different homes as they get ready kindergarten.  This book is a true celebration of diversity with children from many different backgrounds, morning rituals, routines, families, and ways of getting ready to go to school. Adorable illustrations and a perfect ‘CONNECT’ book for your early primary students.

QUESTION

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3. The Night Gardener – The Tan Brothers

Who keeps cutting the trees into animal sculptures during the night?  It is the magical mystery this book will slowly reveal.  Another book with illustrations you will linger over and a unique and creative story that will have your students wondering.

4. Follow the Moon Home – Deborah Hopkinson & Philippe Cousteau

How can a community save the sea turtles of the South Carolina coast?  Powerful story of how young people can make a difference – inspiring and beautiful.  Could also be used for Transform.

VISUALIZE

5. Finding Wild – Megan Wagner

Two kids set off on an adventure away from their urban home and discover all the beauty of the natural world. This book is so full of triple scoop words, I can hardly stand it! Perfect for visualizing and an anchor book for descriptive writing.

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6. I Hear a Pickle – Rachel Isadora

Sweet, simple introduction to the five senses for early primary students.  Great for teaching that visualizing is not just about what we see!

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7. The Whale – Ethan Murrow & Vita Murrow

Wow – this book is truly a remarkable pencil-sketch wordless picture book.  Two children are out to prove that the rumored Giant Spotted Whale in their town is real or a myth.  This is a book where you really need to take your time to read the pictures.  The newspaper headlines also help to tell the story and are perfect for practicing inferring.

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Grandad’s Island – Benji Davies

Benji Davis gifts us with an extraordinary, thought-provoking book about life, death and love.  Poignant, gracefully told story about a young boy trying to understand why his grandfather is no longer in his life.  What makes it so touching is how subtle the message is – leaving the reader with spaces to wonder and to think.

TRANSFORM

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Ada’s Violin – Susan Hood

The extraordinary true tale of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay, an orchestra made up of children playing instruments built from recycled trash. Inspiring and filled with hope.

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10. Be the Change: A Grandfather Gandhi Story – Arun Gandhi & Bethany Hegedus

How can throwing away a worn-down pencil hurt anyone? How can wastefulness lead to violence? With the help of his grandfather, Arun learns how every wasteful act, no matter how small, affects others.  A wonderful transforming story.

There you have it!  My top 10 for 10 picture books for 2016!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Filed under 2016 releases, New Books, Picture Book 10 for 10, Reading Power

Top Ten Tuesday – Top 10 Professional Books For Summer Reading

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Summer time means a little more time to read and reflect on our teaching practice and a chance to catch up on some new professional books.  With the full implementation of the redesigned here in B.C.,  I’m turning to many of these books for ideas and inspiration.  While I do not anticipate getting through ALL of these books, I have some of them beside my bed, some on order and am hoping to get my hands and head through all of them before summer is over.   Certainly these books are getting the ‘BUZZ’ in teacher circles… and I’m proud to say that many of them are written by true north strong and free Canadian writers!  flag

Here are my top ten professional books in my summer TBR pile…

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1. One Without the Other: Stories of Unity Through Diversity and InclusionShelley Moore   flag

Seems fitting that number one on my list is called ONE!  Shelley Moore is a teacher and inclusive consultant in Richmond, B.C. who is rockin’ it as a presenter, TED Talks speaker and now published author.  She is dynamic, funny and passionate about inclusion. Her ‘7-10 split‘ bowling metaphor for inclusion is extraordinary.  If you have never seen it, you can watch it here.  This book is on the top of my must read books this summer!

2.  Innovate with Ipad; Lessons to Transform Learning in the Classroom – Karen Lirenman and Kristen Wideen  flag

I’m SO excited (and proud ) to read this brand new book by these two amazing Canadian teachers and Ipad experts.  I know Karen personally and know how hard she has worked and what extraordinary, innovative things she does with iPADS in her classroom.  This is a must have book for every school!  The book is clearly laid out and shows teachers some basic aps that you can download which can help engage your students in learning and creating independently and creatively.  I love the way they include sections for beginners and more advanced learners, along with quick tips and suggestions on how best to integrate Ipad lessons into all aspects of your teaching.  I also appreciate the fact that these are real teachers who have tried all of these lessons as well as the adaptation of the lessons for teachers who may only have access to one or two Ipads rather than a whole class.  Great job, Karen and Kristen!

2. DIY Literacy: Teaching Tools for Differentiation, Rigor and Independence – Kate Roberts & Maggie Beattie Roberts

There has been a lot of recent buzz about this new resource and I’m excited to share it.  (Just in case there are any teachers who are old like me, DIY stands for ‘DO IT YOURSELF’! )  Maggie & Kate Roberts share four visual teaching tools–demonstration notebooks, bookmarks, charts, and microprogressions–that, if used well, can assist students in becoming truly independent.  This is another wonderful, practical guide for improving your classroom practice!  Wise. Smart. Practical. Doable. Funny. Inspiring.  So easy to read.  The authors provide additional materials on their website, blog and through WEBISODES (another new concept for me!) so there is a lot of additional material to supplement the book.  You can read more about the book and the authors here – http://www.heinemann.com/blog/what-does-diy-literacy-mean/

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3. Writers ARE Readers: Flipping Reading Instruction into Writing Opportunities –                  Lester Laminack and Reba Wadsworth,

Long before Reading Power was ever developed, I did my masters on the  READING-WRITING connection. This book re-affirms everything I know about how reading and writing are so closely linked and that teaching them in isolation is not how we should be teaching.  There are many things to love about this book, but for me, it is the readability of the text and the easy conversational tone that puts it high on my new favorite list.   It feels as if the authors are sitting in your living room talking to you for part of the time and then you are suddenly in a classroom watching them teach.  It’s like having a literacy coach, a master teacher and a literacy expert every time you open the book.  LOVE this one!

4. Developing Self-Regulated Learners – Deborah L. Butler, Leyton Schnellert,  Nancy E. Perry  flag

So proud to be teaching in a province so filled with amazing, dedicated and passionate educators like the authors of this book.  This book focuses on research, theory and practice into SLR – Self Regulated Learners.  It is designed to support special education, classroom practice and educational psychology courses in Teacher Education programs.

5. Craft Moves – Lesson Sets for Teaching Writing with Mentor Texts – Stacey Shubitz

While it is not a new concept to me to use picture books to inspire writing, in Craft Moves, Stacey Shubitz, co-founder of the Two Writing Teachers website, uses twenty recently published picture books and creates more than 180 lessons to teach various ‘crafts’ – otherwise known as traits or techniques.  I appreciate that the books she uses are recent,  that she promotes the use of picture books in both lower and upper elementary and that she includes sample lessons and suggestions for managing writer’s workshop and effective small groups.  This book has just been released so only available through STENHOUSE.  

6. Marvelous Mini-Lessons for Teaching – Nonfiction Writing K-3 – Lori Jamison Rogg  flag

If you are  primary teacher, Lori Jamison Rogg’s ‘Marvelous Mini Lessons’ books are a ‘must have’ for your professional collection.  They are clear, practical, and filled with catchy phrases and easy-to-teach strategies.  Her latest book focuses on writing in the content areas and helping young students learn to write about subjects they care about.   Lori is moving to Vancouver from Toronto this summer so I look forward to seeing more of her and attending a few more of her dynamic presentations.

7. A Mindset for Learning –  Teaching the Traits of Joyful, Independent Growth – Kristine Mraz and Christine Hertz

I had the privilege of hearing one of the authors of this book present at the Reading for the Love of It conference in Toronto this past February and, of course, I bought a copy and got it signed like a groupie!  Based on Carole Dweck’s ground-breaking research around fixed and positive mindsets, these two teachers have developed practical strategies to help foster independent, compassionate caring students and to help them be more responsible for their own choices!  I love this book!

8. Multiple Paths to Literacy – Proven High-Yield Strategies to Scaffold Engaging Literacy Learning Across the Curriculum K-2  –  Miriam P. Trehearne   flag

Canadian consultant and author Miriam Trehearne new book for early primary teachers is definatetly going to get some ‘BUZZ’ starting.  This book is packed full of ideas that link to the new curriculum including: Inquiry, Play, Art, Technology, and Self-Regulation.  I appreciate that Miriam’s books are very practical with lessons you can use, student samples, and assessment tools.  K-2 teachers – take note!

9. Launch – Using Design Thinking To Boost Creativity and Bring Out the Maker in Every Student              John Spencer and A. J. Juliani

Love the title ‘LAUNCH’ and the fact that this book is all about creative thinking – another component to our new curriculum.  I really like clearly laid out books with a structure and process to share with students, along with a common language that can be integrated at every grade level.  ( Now if they only had a song… LOL!)
Here is the basic structure of the creative thinking outlined in the book:
Look, Listen, and Learn
Ask Lots of Questions
Understand the Problem or Process
Navigate Ideas
Create
Highlight What’s Working and Failing

1o.  IQ – A Practical Guide to Inquiry-Based Learning – Jennifer Watt and Jill Colyer

Attention all BC teachers who are looking for a book to help them launch the redesigned curriculum!  I love practical books and this one is I know I will use as we begin to shift into a more inquiry based approach to teaching and learning this fall.

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COMING SOON!!!!!

Powerful Readers Thinking Strategies to Guide Literacy Instruction in Secondary Classrooms

Kyla Hadden (and me!)  flag

I just couldn’t make a list of professional resources without a shameless plug for this book!  Kyla and I have been busy working on the edits – lots of work but the book is coming together so well.  I’m excited for it’s release and for Secondary teachers to get a first hand look at Reading Power strategies in action!  Three cheers for Kyla!

Thanks for stopping by!  What’s in your summer professional TBR pile?

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Filed under Professional Books, Reading Power

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? New Fairy Tales for the New Year

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It’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week. Check out more IMWAYR posts here: Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers

Happy New Year, everyone!  Over my winter break reading and book brousing, I noticed a number of recently released fairy tales. Some are original and some are re-telling of classics – but all are wonderful stories with gorgeous illustrations.   Whether I’m teaching and practicing Questioning or reading aloud for pleasure –  these would definitely be books I would recommend sharing with your students!

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Jack Frost – William Joyce

The third in Joyce’s Guardians of Childhood series, following The Man in the Moon and The Sandman, this is a charming and engaging story about the origin of Jack Frost.  Stunning illustrations.

Imelda and the Goblin King – Briony May Smith

Beautiful and inventive illustrations with a lovely story filled with humour sprinkled with subtle life lessons about bullying.  Complete with fairies, goblins, a Fairy Queen, this is a delightful, whimsical fairy tale.

The Tiger Who Would Be King – James Thurber

This book was on many “Best of 2015” lists last month, but I had not read it.  Now I know why!  This is an intense, rather dark fable about a tiger who wants to overthrow the lion as king and subsequently starts a war in the jungle. A thought-provoking book to spark discussion about war, pride and costs.  I could see reading this book for Remembrance Day and would definitely use it for questioning, inferring and transform.

Toby and the Ice Giants – Joe Willington

The Fox and the Star – Coralie Bickford-Smith

A sweet, magical story about the friendship between a fox and a star.  Gorgeous book – stunning illustrations, beautiful design – even the binding is lovely!  Simple enough for a beginning reader and would be an excellent read-aloud for a grade 2/3 class (it’s 64 pages).  Perfect book for questioning.  LOVE this one!

Winter’s Child – Angela McAllister

A delightful tale about a little boy who loves the winter.  When he befriends the “Winter” child, their friendship prolongs the cold months, delaying Spring’s arrival.  The world freezes, nothing grows, and the little boy’s grandmother is becoming sicker, eventually leading to the realization that the friendship needs to end.   Beautifully written and illustrated.

The Wild Swans – Jackie Morris

Exquisitely beautiful book. A wonderful lyrical version of Han’s Christian Anderson’s classic tale.  Jackie Morris – one of my favorite author/illustrators!

Vasalisa the Beautiful – A Russian Folktale – Anna Morgunova

Another retelling of a classic Russian fairy tale about a heroine who conquers the terrifying Baba Yaga with the help of her magical doll.  This would be more appreciated by older students.  Memorizing illustrations.

The Sleeper and the Spindle – Neil Gaiman

Captivating, dark and slightly twisted tale of Sleeping Beauty (with a sprinkling of Snow White)  told by the amazing Neil Gaiman – as only he can.  The detailed metallic illustrations by Chris Riddell are stunning.  This would be an excellent read-aloud for an intermediate class.  Ah-MAZING!  Great for Text-to-Text connections.

The Most Wonderful Thing in the World – Vivian French

Perfect text, perfect illustrations, and a perfect message that family is truly the most wonderful thing in the world. Lovely read-aloud for primary students.

Happy reading in 2016, everyone!

Thanks for stopping by!  Which Fairy Tale caught your eye?

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Filed under 2015 releases, Fairy Tales, New Books, Question, Reading Power