Tag Archives: Aaron Reynolds

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? New Books for Back to School 2017

download (23)

It’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week. Check out more IMWAYR posts here: Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers

Back to school means lots of new books for new lessons!  Here are a few of the great new titles I’ve been reading!

Imagine – John Lennon, Yoko Ono Lennon, Amnesty International illustrated by Jean Jullien

John Lennon’s iconic song has been transformed into a beautiful picture book and has been published in partnership with Amnesty International for the International Day of Peace on September 21st.   Like the song that inspired it, Imagine invites people to imagine a world at peace, a world of kindness.   As Yoko Ono says in her foreword, “Every small, good thing that we do can help change the world for the better.”   An Imagine website has been launched in nine countries and five languages. Visitors, including young children, can submit their own messages of peace, read those from around the world, and share messages of peace and hope on their social media programs.  Please consider inviting your students to participate.

Carson Crosses Canada

Carson Crosses Canada – Linda Bailey

Carson Crosses Canada by Linda Bailey is a delightful book celebrating Canada! Annie and her dog Carson are on a road trip across Canada from BC to Newfoundland to visit Annie’s sister. Along the way, they stop and visit many amazing sites and see the unique landscape of each province. This book is lively and fun with simple text and bright, whimsical illustrations. I loved the map of her journey and the end papers! This would make a great anchor book to introduce a unit on Canada in your primary class or celebrate Canada 150!

Image result for picture the sky barbara reid

Picture the Sky – Barbara Reid

So excited to see this companion book to Picture a Tree.  In her classic colorful Plasticine style, Barbara Reid explores the stories of the sky – from the weather, to the stars,to the seasons, and to our imagination – in all its moods and colors.  The sky is all around us, but it is always changing.   This book is perfect for visualizing!

Kevin Henkes new

In the Middle of Fall – Kevin Henkes

This wonderful new book by Kevin Henkes will have your senses tingling!  The colors are vibrant and simplistic, it features adorable woodland creatures, and is everything you could want in a book about the changing seasons.  I also liked the fact that it focuses on mid-late fall, when all the changes have already happened.   Great anchor for writing as well – lots of triple scoop words and similes – “the apples are like ornaments”.   I love fall and I love this book!

Tweet bird

Nerdy Birdy Tweets – Aaron Reynolds

Nerdy Birdy Tweets by Aaron Reynolds Is an important book to read to students. Nerdy Birdy learns a valuable lesson about the impact of social media on friendship and the dangers of and posting things about someone else without their permission, Great anchor book to start the conversation about digital citizenship and being responsible and respectful when using social media.

Lovely

Lovely Jess Hong

A celebration of diversity – in all its shapes and sizes!  Big, small, curly, straight, loud, quiet, smooth, wrinkly – we are all LOVELY!  Colorful, bold illustrations and simple text.  This is a great book to build classroom community!

Image result for hello harvest moon

Hello, Harvest Moon – Ralph Fletcher

If you are looking for an anchor book for descriptive, sensory language – look no further!  Ralph Fletcher’s new book (companion to Twilight Comes Twice) follows the moon as it rises and describes all the things it shines on.  Gorgeous illustrations and filled with rich, descriptive language and literary devices.  I would definitely use select pages from this book to do a “Found Poetry” lesson.  (Children highlight favorite words from the text, then use the words to write their own poem.  Additional words can be added.)

“With silent slippers
it climbs the night stairs,
lifting free of the treetops
to start working its magic,
staining earth and sky with a ghostly glow.”

There's nothing to do

There’s Nothing To Do!  – Dav Petty

Loved this third book in the Frog series!  (I Don’t Want to Be a Frog! and I Don’t Want to Be Big! are the first two).  This Frog cracks me up, and all three books will have kids laughing out loud.  This book features Frog dealing with boredom and, while his friends make lots of suggestions, turns out that sometimes nothing is the best thing to do! Sweet message and great voice.

Image result for why am I me

Why Am I Me? – Paige Britt

Wow!  LOVE this book.  The story follows two young children who are curious about why they look the way they do wand why other people look how they do.  It is a celebration of diversity and humanity, about love and compassion for one another, despite color of skin or our appearance.  I’m using it tomorrow with my grade 2’s and 3’s as we explore self identity.  Love the deep-thinking questions and the powerful message.

THinking Cap

Sarabella’s Thinking Cap – Judy Schachner

Loved this book for so many reasons.  One – the illustrations are GORGEOUS (I predict a Caldecott nomination!) Second – the story about a girl who has trouble focusing because she spends so much time in her “Imagination Pocket” – is one that many children will be able to connect to.  Third – the supportive teacher who helps her design her own “thinking cap” which helps transform her creative imagination into something visible.  A wonderful story celebrating daydreaming, imagination, and one great teacher!

Thanks for stopping by!

Lots of great books out there for you to share!  Hope you found one that you can share in your classroom!  Happy reading, everyone!

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under 2017 releases, Canada, Connect, Diversity, It's Monday, What Are You Reading?, New Books, Picture Book, Read-Aloud, Writing Strategies

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? Last Gems of 2015

IMWAYR

It’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week. Check out more IMWAYR posts here: Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers

Well, it’s been quite a fall!  Many weeks have passed since I last wrote a blog post as I have been busy (oh,so busy!) teaching, presenting, traveling, writing, not to mention parenting two teenage boys!  But I now am grateful for some much needed time to catch my breath and enjoy this festive freedom!

Not blogging does not mean I have not been reading!  So I’m happy to share some of the final “new releases” of this year and hoping you will find one or two titles that catch your eye….

The Only Child – Guojing

Breathtaking wordless picture book told in a similar style to The Arrival (Shaun Tan) and The Snowman (Raymond Briggs).  This is the emotional story of a young girl, lost in the winter woods, who is trying to find her way home. Following her magical journey is an emotional rollercoaster: from loneliness and longing to love and joy.  Interesting author’s note explaining this book came out of her experiences growing up lonely under China’s one-child policy (recently reversed). 

Nerdy Birdy – Aaron Reynolds

This is an adorable book about tolerance and acceptance that every teacher should read to their class!  Great message about what it means to be cool and that it’s not just about being accepted by a group, but being true to yourself and including people that are different.  Pop-culturally relevant and very funny. 

Lenny and Lucy – Philip C. Stead

Philip C. Stead and his wife are amazing.  A quiet, comforting story of the joy of a budding friendship wrapped up in a story of moving.   Love the simple language that says so much, so beautifully. 

The Whisperer – Pamela Zagarenski

Amazing celebration of stories.  A little girl borrows a beautiful book from her teacher.  On her way home, the words seem to fly out.  When she arrives home, there are no words so she makes up her own stories for the pictures.  We get the beginning of each story for each page… stories within stories.  Gorgeous illustrations – this book is magical.

The Good-bye Book – Todd Parr

Classic Todd Parr – the “feelings man” – has created a sensitive, touching look at loss as told through the eyes of a fish who has lost his friend.  Important reminder that even though we may not have all the answers, we will always have support from those around us.

The Tea Party in the Woods – Akiko Miyakoshi

A magical winter tale that combines The Little Red Riding Hood with Alice in Wonderland in its own unique way.  A wonderful story about caring and friendship.  Japanese tone – slow, simple and fragile.  Illustrations are gorgeous.

The Bear Report – Thyra Heder

Many connections will be made to this book about a young girl who thinks researching Polar Bears for her report is “BO-RING!”  That is until a Polar Bear shows up and takes her on a tour of his

The Adventures of Miss Petitfour – Anne Michaels

16 cats acting like humans, magic, lots of tea and cakes, delightful illustrations – and lots of triple scoop words!  Adorable.. sweet… charming!  (early novel)

Crenshaw – Katherine Applegate

Magical middle grade novel is a story of friendship, family and resilience by the author of The One and Only Ivan.  Crenshaw is a loud, out-spoken imaginary cat who helps Jackson, a young boy living on the edge of poverty.  Beautiful, heartbreaking and amazing.

Thanks for stopping by!  Would love to know which book has caught your eye!

1 Comment

Filed under 2015 releases, It's Monday, What Are You Reading?, New Books

Summer Reading – Day 31! It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

IMWAYR

It’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week.  Check out more IMWAYR posts here: Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers.

It’s always a bit dangerous for me when I find myself surrounded by new picture books because I want to buy them all!  This past week, Surrey Kidsbooks came to one of my workshops and “set up shop” in the school gym!  As always, Maggie had new books set aside to show me and I’m excited to share them now.

clark-the-shark[1]

On the top of Maggie’s “A MUST for teachers” list this fall, and now on the top of mine, is Clark the Shark by Bruce Hale.  This book is themed around self regulation, a topic of growing interest in education thanks to the insightful work of Canadian educator  Stuart Shanker and others. In this book, we meet Clark – a shark with a very BIG personality.  Clark LOVES everything but sometimes his boisterous enthusiasm gets in the way of his friendships.  His teacher, Mrs. Inkydink, helps him to devise a strategy of making up simple rhymes to calm down and “stay cool”.   An excellent book to share with children – entertaining as well as an important message.

16059377[2]

The Very Inappropriate Word by Jim Tobin is a celebration of words.  I loved this book for so many reasons – it’s funny, has great illustrations and a wonderful subtle message about using appropriate language.  The best part for me is the fact that it’s also written for those, like me, who love words.  The boy in this book loves words – big words, interesting words, hard words.  Things go a little sideways for him when he learns a word that is inappropriate and tries using it.   I love words and I love this book!

51o1L1EIbJL._SL500_AA300_[1]

What Are You Doing? by Elisa Amado is a celebration of reading.  On his way to school, a young boy notices many different people reading.  “What are you doing?”  he asks, to which each responds with another reason for reading.  One person is reading instructions to fix their bike, another is reading a story, while another is reading a guidebook.  Later in the day, he borrows his own book from school to read.  The simple text is a reminder to all of us about the pleasures and purposes for reading.

17659588[1]

The Man with the Violin by Canadian writer Kathy Stinson is based on the true story of renowned American violinist Joshua Bell who gave a free concert one day in a Washington, D.C. subway station.  Thousands of commuters rushed by but only seven stopped to listen.  Dylan, the fictional character in the story, is one of the seven who did stop, although his mother did not want him to.  He is mesmerized by the beautiful sound of the music and the song plays in his head all day.  The illustrations are beautiful and the writing floats and dances like music.  This book is a celebration of music and a great reminder to take the time to appreciate beauty that surrounds us.  An interesting account of the real event is provided at the back.  This was such an interesting story and one that I can see would be the starting point for some excellent class discussions.  I can’t wait to share this with my students.  LOVE it!  81IKKWK3r0L._AA1500_[1]

Miss Maple’s Seeds by Eliza Wheeler is another beautifully illustrated book that celebrates the cycle of seeds and seasons.  Miss Maple collects and cares for lost seeds, carefully searching for a place for them to grow when the time is right for them to find their roots.  I felt like I was walking through a garden when I read this book. A perfect book to launch a science unit on plants or seeds.

6672874[1]

In this witty book Carnivores by Aaron Reynolds, a group of misunderstood carnivores, tired of being made fun of by their plant-eating enemies, form a support group in their attempt to become more politically correct.  Their first plan is to think of converting to plant-eating but that plan does not go well because Wolf can’t find a berry bush without a bunny in it!  (hilarious!)  This book is meant to be read out loud – it is so funny.  Small children may not understand the humor but the bold, punch-line, slap-stick delivery would certainly be appreciated by older students.

     17243952[1]

David Shannon latest book  Bugs in My Hair!   is a humorous look at head lice.  Let’s face it – most teachers have had the unwelcome experience of a lice outbreak in their classrooms.  This book deals with this situation in an informative and light-hearted way that would make children feel less embarrassed about this unpleasant experience.  A great book to have on hand – just in case you get a case!

18143297[1]

A Mountain of Friends by Kirsten Schoene is a heartwarming story of a penguin who has a dream to fly.  His friends work together to help him achieve this seemingly impossible goal.  The illustrations are beautiful and children will love how the book needs to be turned from landscape to portrait to view the “mountain” of friends.  A great book to teach children about working together to help others.

    road[1]

The Road to Afghanistan by Linda Granfield is a moving book honoring those committed Canadian soldiers who fought in this war and experienced things none of us really can understand.  This is a reflective book about the successes and challenges of war and gives us a glimpse of Afghan people, culture and land to help us connect.  It is definitely a book I will add to my Remembrance Day collection, particularly given the Canadian focus.

Well, it’s been a great week of new books!  I’d love to hear about what you’ve been reading!

15 Comments

Filed under Friendship, It's Monday, What Are You Reading?, New Books, Picture Book, Science, Social Responsibility