Tag Archives: Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Adrienne’s OLLI – Online Learning Lesson Idea #16 – Leaving Our Heartprints

I originally created OLLIs when schools in my province of British Columbia shut down last spring due to Covid19.  While we are now back in class, I know there are many districts still juggling virtual and in-class support.  These OLLIs can be used both in class and virtually person.  Either way, I hope you find some ideas that you can use with your students to lighten your load just a little this year!  

Here is a list of the previous OLLI lessons and anchor books in case you missed any of them:

OLLI#1 (The Hike)

OLLI#2. (If I Could Build A School)

OLLIE#3  (Mother’s Day)

OLLI#4 (Everybody Needs a Rock)

OLLI #5(WANTED:  Criminals of the Animal Kingdom) 

OLLI #6 – (Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt)

OLLI #7 (All About Feelings – “Keep it! – Calm it! – Courage it!)  

OLLI #8 (I’m Talking DAD! – lesson for Father’s Day) 

OLLI #9 (Be Happy Right Now!) 

OLLI #10 – (Dusk Explorers)

OLLI#11 (If You Come to Earth)

OLLI #12 (Map of Good Memories)

OLLI #13 (Harvey Slumfenburger)

OLLI #14 (New Year’s Resolutions)

OLLI #15 ( 100 Things That Make Me Happy)

THE INSPIRATION:

As we turn a page on a new month and start to prepare for Valentine’s Day, most of us will be talking to our students about kindness.  Why not use this month to inspire a little heartprinting in your class!  This lesson comes directly from my book Powerful Understanding (Understanding Others – page 101-103, 121), but in case you don’t have a copy, here it is!  

THE ANCHOR (Primary) 

A World of Kindness – Anne Featherstone

This simple book outlines clear, concrete examples of different ways you can be kind.  From waiting your turn, to helping someone younger – this book is a great starting point for discussing “actions of kindness” that leave heartprints on others.   You can find the online read aloud – HERE 

Note:  The read aloud narrator on Youtube starts by greeting “grade 1’s” so you may wish to just start the video a few seconds in if you don’t teach grade one!  

The Anchor – Intermediate

Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed – Emily Pearson

One of my very favorite anchor books for introducing random acts of kindness and discussing how an ordinary deed can change the world.  While it looks like it would be more geared for younger readers, the message is for everyone!  A wonderful story about the ripple effect that kindness can have and a bonus math lesson on expediential growth at the end!  

You can watch a video of the read-aloud HERE  

The Lesson

  • Begin with the “one word” activity.  Write the word “Kindness” on the board or chart stand.  Invite students to think about a connection, a visual image, and a feeling connected to that word.  Have students share their ideas with a partner and then brainstorm out.
  • Create a class web, recording their ideas around the word using one color of pen.  Tell the students you are going to come back to this web at the end of the lesson to see if our thinking has stretched.  
  • Show a photo of a footprint in sand.  Ask the students what it is and how it’s made.  Show a picture of a handprint and ask the same thing.
  • Write the word “heartprint” on the board.  Ask students what they think it might be – discuss in partners and with the class. 
  • Explain that a heartprint, like a footprint or handprint is something that you leave behind.  But unlike a footprint or handprint, you can’t actually see it.  But you do feel it inside your heart.  
  • Ask students how someone might leave behind a heartprint.  Invite students to share some ideas.  Discuss that leaving heartprint is often done quietly, without being asked.  Depending on your grade, you can introduce the concept of “random acts of kindness”.  
  • Share the anchor book A World of Kindness.  Invite students to listen for ways to be kind and leave heartprints.  
  • After the story, discuss examples of kindness from the story.  Discuss how the acts were sometimes very simple.   Leaving a heartprint doesn’t have to be big or involve “buying someone a present”.  It could be as simple as letting someone go first, or giving someone a compliment.  
  • Revisit the One Word activity “kindness” on the board and invite students to reflect on the word.  How has our thinking about this word changed or stretched?  Invite students to share and record new ideas, using a different color felt, to show the change in thinking.
  • Explain that this month is Family Day and Valentines Day – both days give us opportunities to leave heartprints at home and at school
  • Create a T-chart and brainstorm ways they can leave heartprints at home (clean up my room, take out the garbage without being asked, thank mother or father for cooking the supper, do a chore in secret, share a toy with your brother or sister) and at school (leave a positive message on a sticky note on someone’s desk, clean out someone’s desk, hold the door for someone, let someone go infront of you) 
  • Plan a Heartprint Week in your class next week.  Invite students to come up with ways they will leave heartprints for others.  
  • Pass out the template “Leaving My Heartprint” for students to complete.  They set their goals at the top and then complete the bottom at the end of the week.  

         Download the template HERE

Additional books about spreading kindness: 

Here are some additional books about kindness you can share throughout your Heartprint Week.  I’ve tried to include options for both primary and intermediate ages.   If you don’t have a physical copy of the book, many are available as online read-alouds.  Just google the title and search “video”.    One important theme I would try to include is how one person’s small act kindness can make a huge difference to many.  Don’t forget to revisit the word “kindness” and add new thinking to the One Word Activity after you read.

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What Does it Mean to Be Kind? – Rana DiOrio

When We Are Kind – Monique Gray Smith

Lend a Hand – Poems About Giving – John Frank

The Can Man – Laura E. Williams

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The Jelly Donut Difference – Maria Demondy

Somebody Loves You, Mr. Hatch – Eileen Spinelli

How Kind! – Mary Murphy

The Pink Umbrella – Amelia Callot

The Love Letter – Anika Aldamay Denise 

Plant a Kiss – Amy Krouse Rosenthal

The Mitten Tree – Candace Christiansen

 Be Kind – Pat Zietlow Miller

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The Kindness Quilt – Nancy Elizabeth Wallace

Tomorrow I’ll l Be Kind – Jessica Hische

The Day it Rained Hearts – Felicia Bond

Share Some Kindness, Bring Some Light – Apryl Stott

Thanks for stopping by!  Happy Heartprinting, everyone! 

 

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Filed under Kindness, New Books, OLLI, Online Books and Lessons, Social Responsibility, Valentine's Day

IMWAYR – Lunch in a Book Store and New Picture Books

It’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week. Check out more IMWAYR posts here: Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers

Earlier this week, my husband and I celebrated our wedding anniversary.  Yesterday, we spent the day in Fort Langley – a lovely little town about 40 minutes drive away from our home in Vancouver.  It’s a delightful place to spend an afternoon mooching around in the bakeries, books stores and gift stores.  My favorite place to visit there is Wendel’s Book Store and Cafe.  Delicious fresh food and a wonderful collection of books, cards and stationary.  It’s always crowded, but while you wait for your food… you can do a little book browsing (and sniffing!)  What fun!  I highly recommend a visit!

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Wendel’s Books and Cafe – Fort Langley, BC

We also visited a great local winery called Chaberton Estates.  After some wine tasting, we sat outside in the sunshine and toasted our anniversary with some delicious Sauvignon Blanc.  Yum!

I found my way to the children’s section (in the book store – not the winery!), parked my adult largeness in the smallness of a tiny blue wooden chair with a pile of brand new 2018 picture books. And here they are….

                           The New LiBEARian – Alison Donald

A celebration of libraries and reading – and oh, I love this book!  Adorable picture book about a library where the characters refuse to stay in their books and a librarian who has mysteriously disappeared!   The pictures perfectly capture the magic of libraries and stories and would be great for a library story time or as an anchor for fractured fairy tales.

Dear Girl, – Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Paris Rosenthal

Dear Girl,
This book is for you.
Wonderful, smart, beautiful you.
If you ever need a reminder, just turn to any page in this book and know that you are special and you are loved.
Amy and Paris

I must admit I got a bit teary when I saw this book, co-written by the late, great Amy Krouse Rosenthal and her daughter, Paris.  Each page of this book is filled with tenderness and goodness. Each page is a celebration of daughters of every kind and an encouragement to young girls to find their own way in discovering what makes them wonderful, smart, and beautiful.  This is a must have book and the perfect birthday or graduation present.  Amy’s gift and legacy lives on.

What Do You Do With A Chance? Kobi Yamada

Follow-up to the award winning What Do You With A Problem? and What Do You Do With an Idea?, Kobi Yamada has given readers another charming book in the series.  This one is an empowering, inspirational story about not letting fear hold you back and the possibilities that await you if you are brave enough to take a chance.  Another great gift for graduation (How can you tell I have a son who will soon be graduating???)  Lovely pencil and watercolor illustrations.

Lola Dutch Kenneth and Sarah Jane Wright

Lola Dutch is a spunky, sassy gal bursting with creative ideas, imagination and joy.  I love how passionate Lola is about making everyday things fancy and extravagant.  Delightful book with rhyming text and colorful, playful illustrations.  Perfect to inspire creativity and imagination!  So be like Lola – put that Ipad down and grab some glitter and glue!   This would be a great book to inspire some Maker Space projects!

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                                         My Pillow Keeps Moving!  – Laura Gehl

I laughed out loud when I read this adorable book by Laura Gehl.  A lonely man tries to buy a pillow . . . and ends up with a new best friend.  Doggy impersonates everything the lonely man needs–a pillow, a footstool, a jacket. But in the end, just being her sweet self is what the man needs most.  This a perfect book for teaching inferring to your primary students – few words and delightful, story-telling illustrations.  Lots of belly laughs with this one!

The Boy and the Blue Moon by [O'Leary, Sara]                                       The Boy and the Blue Moon – Sara O’Leary

Shhhhhh….. there is magic between these pages.  Start with a little boy and a cat on a nighttime adventure…Sprinkle a little touch of Where the Wild Things Are, Owl Moon, and The Little Prince... weave together some facts about phases of the moon, the solar system and dreams.  Oh… and don’t forget some spectacular illustrations.  What can I say?  Sara O’Leary (A Family is a Family is a Family, This is Sadie) continues to create these whimsical, magical books that beg to be shared.  And this one just might be my favorite.

Marigold and Daisy – Andrea Zuill

Hilarious new sibling book and a great one for helping young children with the sometimes challenging transition of welcoming a new baby into the family.  Easy read-aloud with simple text and a cute twist.

Reading Beauty Kimberly Long Cockroft

WOW!  So SO LOVE this whimsical, creative twisted fairy tale with its message that even the most reluctant reader can find a book that will capture them!  Friends Ellie and Gabe are imaginative and creative but they do NOT like to read. During Library-time at their school, they hide under a potted plant and chew gum instead of reading.  “Reading is boring,” Ellie tells the librarian Ms. Molly.  But book-loving Ms. Molly is no ordinary librarian and she casts a spell on Ellie, putting her into a “deep read”.  Deeper and deeper Ellie falls under the enchanted spell of books.  How good is this book?  Can you stand it?  This is one of those books that makes me think, “Why didn’t I write this?”

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Cheers to great book stores, new picture books and drinking wine in the sunshine!

                                                            Thanks for stopping by!

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Filed under 2018 releases, It's Monday, What Are You Reading?, New Books, Picture Book

It’s Monday What Are You Reading? New Picture Books for Fall – Part 2

IMWAYR

It’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week. Check out more IMWAYR posts here: Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers

The Way to School – Rosemary McCarney and Plan International

Just what would you go through to get to school? This stunning book explores how, in some countries, children often have to travel through disaster zones, cross dangerous waters, climb mountains and maneuver zip-lines just to get into the classroom. Some of them even carry their own desk!   The determination in the children’s expressions and in their body language as they make their way to school would be perfect for practicing inferring. An important book to share with children and one that could stimulate a conversation about the desire for education and the physical commitment so many children face each day.  Simple text and stunning photographs – this book is a gem!  Proceeds from the sale of this book go to Plan Canada, one of the largest international development agencies in the world.

The Good Little Book – Kyo Maclear

I admit that I got a little teary-eyed reading this book… It is a classic love story of sorts: Boy finds book, boy falls in love with book, boy takes book everywhere, boy loses book… But truly this is the story about the transformation that books can have in our lives: the adventures, the relationships, and the memories. Amazing whimsical illustrations. This is definitely a book to start off your school year.

The Little Book of Big Fears – Monica Arnaldo

Simple, rhyming text introduces 16 children who share their fears – from raccoons to the dark.  Alphabet book of sorts – but the missing letters spell out GUTSY and BRAVE.  Perfect book for making connections with K-2!  My only thought was that there was no reference to how you can conquer these fears – but an important “after reading” discussion!

Waiting – Kevin Henkes

Love. Love. Love.  I love this book so much.  Soft, simple, quiet, wise, gentle, whimsical – Kevin Henkes is a master storyteller.  Waiting is about five toy friends who sit on the windowsill of a child’s home waiting for their turn at play.  I already have a plan for reading this book to a primary class, focusing on visualizing:  read through, without interruption and allow the students to delight in the sounds of the words and let their minds imagine.  After the book is finished, I will ask them, “Hmmmm, what do you think the friends are waiting for?  Turn and talk to your partner.”   Hug this book.  Love this book.  It’s “waiting” to be read.

Friendshape – Amy Krouse Rosenthal

 This latest book by the clever, creative Amy Krouse Rosenthal, about the friends who “shape” our lives, is filled with fun word play, great illustrations and would make a wonderful read-aloud for a primary classroom!  Not my very favorite Rosenthal book but certainly worth a look!

With A Friend By Your Side – Barbara Kerley

National Geographic photographer Barbara Kerley captures images of friends from around the world and pairs them with simple, touching text.  Wonderful book for making connections and also learning about different places in the world.  Map and background information about each photo are included in the back.

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That’s (NOT) Mine – Anna King

Two cute fuzzy bears want the same chair but they do not want to share. Great illustrations, a lesson on manners and a lot of laughs! 

Lizard from the Park – Mark Pett

Adorable story of a young boy who finds a lizard egg in the park.  Crack!  It hatches into a pet lizard… who grows… and grows.. .and grows!  Charming illustrations by the author/illustrator of The Boy and the Airplane and The Girl and Bicycle.  Lovely surprise ending!

I (Don’t) Like Snakes – Nicola Davies

Fun blend of fiction and non-fiction about snakes.  Although the narrator is convinced that she doesn’t like snakes, for every negative she identifies, her snake-loving family come up with the positives!  Interesting information and great illustrations!  I love anything Nicola Davies writes! 

Bug in A Vacuum – Melanie Watt

This clever picture book explores the 5 stages of grief through the eyes of a bug who gets sucked up by a vacuum.    Sounds strange, but it’s brilliant and emotional and the illustrations are hilarious.  I would definitely read this to older students.  Another winner by the author of Scaredy Squirrel.

Thanks for stopping by!  Would love to know which book(s) has caught your eye?

 

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Filed under 2015 releases, Connect, It's Monday, What Are You Reading?, making connections, New Books

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? Summer Preview – Part 2

 

IMWAYR

It’s Monday and I’mIt’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week. Check out more IMWAYR posts here: Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers

This week, I am highlighting the rest of my list of summer previews!  In case you missed it, you can read Summer Previews – Part 1 here.

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Dewey Bob – Judy Byron Schachner

This looks like it will be a charming book about a sweet raccoon who lives by himself with his many collections of treasures but is missing a friend.

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Little Miss, Big Sis – Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Anything written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal is a winner – and with illustrations by Peter. H. Reynolds this is one to watch for!  The story explores the wonders of becoming a big sister and celebrating the arrival of a new baby into the family.

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Water is Water – Miranda Paul

A beautiful, descriptive look at the water cycle.  This one is not only one to use for science but also a beautiful example of descriptive language and sensory images.

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Rude Cakes – Rowboat Watkins

Who knew cakes were so rude?   A wacky book about manners.  This one looks like it will bring some laughs!

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One Word From Sophia – Jim Averbeck

Sophia desperately wants a pet giraffe and tries varied techniques to convince her parents to get her one for her birthday. Looks playful and fun and will be a great addition to my list of “persuasive” anchor books!

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What Pet Should I Get? – Dr. Seuss

A never-before-seen book by Dr. Seuss about a brother and sister trying to decide what pet to buy from the pet store.  I can’t wait to read this one!

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I Yam a Donkey! – Cece Bell

Hysterical and silly look at grammar as a Yam lectures a clueless and grammatically challenged donkey.   A perfect book for all ages – great in an English class to discuss importance of using proper grammar.

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Maple and Willow Apart – Lori Nichols

I’m looking forward to reading this third book in the charming  Maple and Willow series.  In this book, Willow has to adjust when Maple starts school.  I love the artwork in these books and the strong sibling bond.

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Sea Rex – Molly Idle

I love everything Molly Idle writes.  I fell in love with Flora as she danced with a Flamingo and skated with a Penguin and am now looking forward to Cordelia swimming with her Sea Rex friend.

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Something Extraordinary Ben Clanton

This looks like it will be a great anchor book for writing!  Have you ever wished for something extraordinary? Like the ability to fly? Or to breathe underwater? What if you could talk to animals?  What would you wish for?

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Piper Green and the Fairy Tree – Ellen Potter

This is the first in a new early chapter book series about a girl who says everything that’s on her mind (for better or worse) and has something unusual in her front yard: a fairy tree. I’m sure this will be a popular one at my school!

Big Dog and Little Dog (Reader) – Dav Pilkey

This series originally came out as board books but are now available as Level 1 readers.   Looks like a sweet series by the master of the super wedgie!

Thanks for stopping by!  Which book or books have caught your eye?

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Filed under It's Monday, What Are You Reading?, New Books

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? – I Can’t Keep Up!

IMWAYR

I’m happy to be joining in the weekly IMWAYR posts, hosted by Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee from Unleashing Readers

Well… we are back in full swing at school but my Pro. D. workshops this week were still cancelled (or post-poned) as teachers were just getting settled into their new classes.  This meant I had a bonus day off – most of which I spent at one of my favorite places – United Library Services!  There, I get to fill a SHOPPING CART with BRAND NEW picture books to read through!  Heaven!  But there are SO many great new books – I’m having a hard time keeping up!  Here are a few of my favorites from the top of a very tall pile!

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As an Oak Tree Grows – G. Brian Karas

This book is filled with so many teaching ideas I can hardly stand it!  The story follows the life of an Oak Tree from 1775 to present day.  Each page shows what has changed in the past 25 years – both in the tree and in the surrounding landscape.   I loved the timeline at the bottom of the page, showing each new era.  The illustrations are remarkable – and the book is large which allows the reader to take in all the details on each page.  The Oak tree grows while history transforms around it – from methods of agriculture,  transportation to uses of energy.  The poster included at the back of the book shows the rings on the oak tree representing the growth of the oak tree labeled and dated with many events and inventions that occurred while the tree grew.  This book is creative, unique and interesting!  A perfect link to a unit on growth and change in nature and in our world.

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The Right Word – Roget and His Thesaurus  by Jen Bryant

Sigh.  Sigh again.  I love this book.  So so much.   This amazing picture book biography is about the life of brilliant scientist and word collector Peter Mark Roget. The book explores his extraordinary journey that turned his love of words into the publication of the most important reference books of all time. The illustrations are stunning! If you love words as much as I do – this is a must have for your biography collection!  Watch the book trailer here.

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Vanilla Ice Cream – Bob Graham

I am a fan of Bob Graham books – I admire his ability to leave room for lots of deep thinking within his subtle text and detailed illustrations.  This book follows an endearing, curious sparrow on an unexpected journey as he travels across the world in a bag of rice from India to an urban setting (Australia?) The sparrow finds a family and invites a child to taste vanilla ice cream for the first time.  The soft pallet illustrations are classic Graham and I like how he uses a variety of closed panels with open drawings.  Don’t read this book too quickly – there is a lot to take in!

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Uni the Unicorn – Amy Krouse Rosenthal

When I see Amy Krouse Rosenthal has a new book – I KNOW it’s going to be brilliant.  But I admit, when Maggie (from Kidsbooks) first showed me the cover  the cover of Uni the Unicorn, my heart sank a little bit.  Oh, I thought, these illustrations are not my thing.  They appeared too “Disney” like – rainbows, butterflies and unicorns.  What was she thinking?  But then I read the story and realized just how brilliant a story it was and how perfectly matched the illustrations were!  Amy Krouse Rosenthal’s latest book is a delightful twist to a familiar story. Uni is a unicorn who believes in her heart that little girls are real, despite the fact that her friends and parents say otherwise. Love the page where Uni is drawing pictures of “imaginary” little girls! Little girls will LOVE this story and make LOTS of connections! The illustrations are reminiscent of Pixar/Disney and will most certainly appeal to the unicorn loving children!   I was also thinking that if you added a cute little stuffed unicorn you have the perfect birthday party present!

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If Kids Ruled the World – Linda Bailey

If Kids ruled the world, birthday cake would be good for you.  Your doctor would say “Don’t forget to eat your birthday cake so you’ll grow up strong and healthy!”  And so the story goes – page after page –  a “wish list” of a kid’s paradise!  This book is fun, playful, imaginative and I can just hear the “YES’s” coming from the class!   A perfect anchor book for inspiring writing and art!  Love!

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Penguin and Pumpkin – Salina Yoon

I fell in love with Penguin when I first met him in Penguin and Pinecone.  There have been a few Penguin books since, but none have quite come close to that emotional connection I had with that first book.  This story is sweet with familiar bold block colored illustrations.  Penguin and friends take a journey to explore fall outside the North Pole. He brings a few sights and sounds for his baby brother to experience.  I loved the last page when it’s “snowing leaves”  but the story fell a little flat for me.

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Brothers of the Wolf – Caroll Simpson

This is a beautifully illustrated West Coast First Nations legend about two wolf cub brothers found and raised  as human children in a village on the Pacific.  One cub feels at home in the forest and the other – the sea.  They are separated when supernatural forces change them into Sea Wolf and Timber Wolf.  Although separated, they howl together into the night sky, waking up the moon and bringing light to the darkness of the world.  The story is visually stunning and is a perfect book for questioning. It would also be a great inspiration for creating first nations paintings.

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I Wanna Go Home – Karen Kaufmann Orloff

I have shared Karen Orloff’s first hilarious book, I Wanna Iguana, for many years with students and teachers as an anchor book for persuasive writing. In it, young Alex writes letters to his mother, trying to convince her to let him have a pet iguana.  His mother writes back, with all the reasons why an iguana would not make a good pet.   In the second book,  I Wanna New Room, Alex is trying to persuade his mom to let him have his own room.  In this third book, and possibly the funniest, Alex is sent to his grandparent’s retirement community while his parents go on vacation.  His desperate emails to his parents go from complaining about being dragged to his grandpa’s bridge games to delight in eating ice cream before dinner!  I love the connection to grandparents in this book and the fact that Alex is now sending emails!   Hilarious read-aloud!

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Orchestra Pit – Johanna Wright

What happens when an endearing snake accidently wanders into an orchestra pit instead of a snake pit?   A whole lot of playful chaos!  The snake proceeds to investigate various instruments and causes quite a commotion among the musicians.  This book is hysterical and would be a perfect way to introduce the different instruments in an orchestra to young children.  Lively, colorful illustrations and endearing expressions on the snake!  Love this!

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Lucky – David Mackintosh

I LOVED Marshall Armstrong is New to Our School when it first came out so was excited to see this new book by British author/illustrator David Mackintosh.  This book is hilarious and one that children who have ever “jumped to conclusions” will make connections to!  When Leo’s mom tells him that there will “be a surprise” at dinnertime – Leo and his brother, desperate to find out, begin coming up with all sorts of possibilities – a bike? a new car? a new TV? a swimming pool?  By the end of the day they are convinced that the surprise is an all-expense paid two week trip to Hawaii!  And of course when they get home from school and discover the real surprise, they are left feeling let down.  All children have experienced the feeling of getting their hopes up and then being let down  – but it’s how you handle your disappointment that creates the teachable moment in this book.   David Mackingtosh handles it with humour and the subtle message of how being grateful for what you already have is enough to make you feel “lucky”.  Brilliant!

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The Boy on the Porch – Sharon Creech

I always tell my students that the greatest writers don’t tell us everything, but  “leave spaces for our thinking”.  Sharon Creech’s book is a perfect example of this – she doesn’t tell us evetyhing but provides us with spaces for asking questions and for thinking.  This book is beaurtifully written – simple, tender and powerful.  It is the story of a couple who discover a boy on their porch with only his name pinned to his shirt – “Jacob”.  (What are you wondering?… Who is he?  Where did he come from?  Why did his parents leave him?  Will they come back for him?   (So many questions!)  The boy does not speak but communicates through his extraordinary gift in music and art. Eventually, he is able to communicate with animals.  I read this book in one sitting and then I cried – not because it was sad but because it was so beautiful.  And because as I read it, I could not wait to hear my students filling in the spaces.   There is no better book to read.

Well, that’s it for now!  My pile of new books is only a little smaller now but I’d better stop!  Thanks for stopping by and please share the book that caught your eye!

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Filed under Art, celebrating words, It's Monday, making connections, Music, New Books, Picture Book, Question, Social Studies, What Are You Reading?, Writing Anchors

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading – Christmas Classics (part 2)

IMWAYR

It’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week.  Check out more IMWAYR posts here:  Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers.

Last week, I shared some of my old favorites from my Christmas collection.  This week, I’m excited to share some “holiday versions” of some of my favorite characters and stories.

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It’s Christmas, David! – David Shannon.   David Shannon wrote a book when he was five using the only two words he knew how to spell:  “no” and “David”.  When his mother passed along his keepsake box when he was an adult, he discovered the book… and the rest, as they say,  is history!  In this holiday version of the popular “David” series, we follow David as he snitches Christmas cookies and peeks in closets, and as usual, has trouble staying out of trouble!  A delightful, funny read-aloud with lots of possibilities for “making connections”.

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Christmas Cookies – Bite Size Holiday Lessons – Amy Krouse Rosenthal   I adore anything that Amy Krouse Rosenthal writes.  I loved her original Cookies: Bite Sized Lessons so was thrilled when this book came out in time for the holidays a few years ago.  In these books, Rosenthal cleverly uses the analogy of making and eating cookies to define and illustrate important concepts such as respect, trustworthiness, patience, politeness, loyalty, etc.  The book reads a little like a dictionary – each page sharing a new word and example.  In the Christmas Cookies version, she includes holiday-related words like joy, patience, believe, celebrate, peace and tradition.  One of the things I love about Amy Krouse Rosenthal’s books is how simple they are – and this one is a perfect example – she  incorporates larger words that indirectly teaches children the meaning through the text.  This book is a perfect Christmas read-aloud in a classroom and would also make a wonderful holiday gift!  Adorable illustrations!

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The Christmas Quiet Book – Deborah Underwood   How many different kinds of quiet leading up to Christmas are there?  How about – “Searching for presents quiet,” “Getting caught quiet”, “Hoping for a snow day quiet” and the “shattered ornament quiet“.   I made connections to every page!   I loved the original The Loud Book and The Quiet Book so again, was excited to see the Christmas version.  The illustrations in this book are adorable – soft, gentle and quiet.  LOVE this book!

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Snowmen at Night – Carolyn and Mark Buehner  In this delightful follow-up to Snowmen at Night, we follow snowman on a Christmas adventure while the rest of the world is sleeping.  The illustrations are magical – every time I read the book I see something new!  A wonderful, fun read that would lead to great art and writing activities

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Scaredy Squirrel Prepares for Christmas – Melanie Watt   Christmas would not be complete without Scaredy Squirrel!  My students have grown to love his insecurities, his worries, his cheesy grin and all his fears.  This holiday safety guide is filled with practical tips and step by step instructions to help readers prepare for a perfect Christmas, Scaredy style! From making Christmas crafts to dressing “holiday style” to choosing the perfect tree – this witty, laugh out loud book will delight Scaredy fans everywhere!  I love using these books to teach students about text features – labels, maps, fact boxes!  Have your students create a “Scaredy Squirrel” version of instructions for their favorite holiday activity!

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Carl’s Christmas – Alexander Day   The “Carl” books were, for me, my first real experience with the wordless picture book genre.  The original Good Dog, Carl book was published in 1996.  The premise of the books is a Rottweiler named Carl who is left in charge of the baby while the parents go out.  Sounds ridiculous, I know, but somehow, it works.  Day’s illustrations require no words – they tell the story seamlessly.  In this book, Carl and baby prepare for Christmas, go shopping, do some Christmas baking and have a reindeer encounter!  My boys LOVED Carl books when they were younger.  If you have never read a Carl book – you are missing something special!

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Pete the Cat Saves Christmas – James Dean and Eric Litwin   Pete the Cat is cool!  He’s groovy!  He’s charming!  And in this book, he is saving Christmas by helping Santa, who has a bad cold and needs help delivering presents.  I love Pete – he is a character on the opposite end of the worry scale from Scaredy Squirrel and serves as a great role model for younger kids.   This book is a parody of Twas’ the Night Before Christmas and includes the classic free song download.  (the song isn’t my favorite but my students always want to sing along with Pete!)  This book is an uplifting message of “giving it your all” that is an important one to share with children.

Bear Stays Up for Christmas – Karen Wilson.   Bear’s friends wake him up from his hibernation to include him in the Christmas preparations.  Bear does and when his friends all fall asleep – he stays up to give his friends a special Christmas surprise.  I am not a huge fan of rhyming texts as I often feel that they are forced.  Karen Wilson manages to create rhyme in such a natural way that you don’t even notice it rhymes!  The story flows in a lovely, lyrical tempo that makes it such an enjoyable read-aloud.  I enjoyed many of her previous books featuring Bear – and this one includes the giving spirit of Christmas as well as friendship.

Well… there you have it!  Some favorite stories and characters  “dressed in holiday style”!  What are your favorite “holiday versions” of familiar stories?

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