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Adrienne’s OLLI – Online Learning Lesson Idea #22 – Making a Difference

I originally created OLLIs when schools in my province of British Columbia shut down last spring due to Covid19.  While many are now back in class, I know there are many districts still juggling virtual and in-class support. (Shout out to my teacher friends in Alberta and Ontario who are working online at the moment!) These OLLIs can be used both in class and virtually person.  Either way, I hope you find some ideas that you can use with your students to lighten your load just a little this year!  

Here is a list of the previous OLLI lessons and anchor books in case you missed any of them:

OLLI#1 (The Hike)

OLLI#2. (If I Could Build A School)

OLLIE#3  (Mother’s Day)

OLLI#4 (Everybody Needs a Rock)

OLLI #5 – (WANTED:  Criminals of the Animal Kingdom) 

OLLI #6 – (Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt)

OLLI #7 (All About Feelings – “Keep it! – Calm it! – Courage it!)  

OLLI #8 (I’m Talking DAD! – lesson for Father’s Day) 

OLLI #9 (Be Happy Right Now!) 

OLLI #10 – (Dusk Explorers)

OLLI#11 (If You Come to Earth)

OLLI #12 (Map of Good Memories)

OLLI #13 (Harvey Slumfenburger)

OLLI #14 (New Year’s Resolutions)

OLLI #15 ( 100 Things That Make Me Happy)

OLLIE #16 (Leaving Our Heartprints) 

OLLIE #17  (The Sounds of Snow)  (This post is temporarily unavailable)

OLLIE #18 – Celebrating Women Trail Blazers

OLLIE #19 – The Six Senses of Spring

OLLIE #20 – Thank you, Earth!

OLLI #21 – Mother’s Day Poem

The Inspiration

You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you.  What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.         – Jane Goodall

An essential goal for teachers in the 21st century is to try to help students understand that they are in important part of the global community.  No matter our age, our actions can affect and contribute to the world.  Most children living in North America don’t really understand that, for the most part, they are among the most privileged in the world and because of that privilege, they have a responsibility as a global citizen to be mindful and helpful of others.  And while we may not able to take our students to Africa to help build a school, as this year winds down, we can help bring awareness that our actions, no matter how small, can make a big difference. 

The Anchor:

One Two Many  – Linda Grace Smith

Listen to the author read her story on Simbi HERE

Watch YouTube Read-Aloud HERE 

One Too Many introduces young readers to social justice issues (poverty, education, safety) in a child-friendly and easily accessible way.  Simple, rhyming text with repeating phrases will leave the reader feeling more aware of those in need and inspired to take action.  An important book to explore basic needs and access to them and simple ways we can all make a difference.

Added bonus – Author Linda Grace Smith will be sharing her book during a Virtual Author Visit next week! (more information below! Don’t miss out! )

The Lesson:

  • Write the words “NEED” and “WANT” on the board.  Invite students to think about what the difference is in the two words.  Give an example:  I need food and water to live; I want a new video game.  Invite students to share some of their own ideas.  Create a list on the board.
  • Look at the “NEED” list – introduce the term “Basic Needs” and explain that there are only a few “basic needs” people need to survive – food, water, clothing, shelter, and love.  Without those things, it becomes difficult to live your life.  Explain that everything on the “WANT” side of the chart are not necessary for survival.  We might WANT a new video game but we don’t actually NEED it to survive.
  • Explain that if someone does not have their basic needs, life can be very difficult.  Most of us don’t need think about what we are going to eat, where we are going to sleep, or if we have clothes to wear. 
  • Ask students if they think everyone in the world has basic needs.  Discuss the fact that there are many people living in different places in the world who don’t have food, water, shelter, clothing, or love.  Ask if they think that it’s fair that we do and they don’t?

But there are 7 billion other people in the world, so I probably don’t need to do anything.  I can live in my house and play my video games and go to soccer practice, eat pizza, play with my friends, and live a good life. I can’t really do anything about it – I’m just a kid!  Agreed? 

  • Write or show this quote: “If you think you are too small to make a difference, try spending a night in a closed room with a mosquito.”  – African Proverb  
  • Invite students to talk to their partner and infer what they think it means. (if one tiny mosquito can make that big an impact – then I guess I can, too)  It only takes one small action to make a big difference!
  • Read the book One Too Many.  Explain that the author wrote it because she wanted us to start thinking about others and about ways we might be able to help.  Invite the students to be listening for ways they might be able to help.
  • Close the book and say “Sometimes, when I finish reading a story, the book ends but my thinking doesn’t.  This book is really lingering (triple scoop word!) in my mind. 
  • Ask the students what is “lingering” for them.  You might model:

It really made me think about others and also how one small act can make a big difference. One person can make a huge difference – just like one tiny mosquito can have a huge impact on a gigantic human.  You are the mosquito; the person is the world.  I may not be able to help people in other countries get clean water or food, but I can make a difference by my everyday small actions.  Don’t ever think that one small action is not going to make a difference.  YOU CAN make a difference!

  • Create an “I CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE” chart.  Brainstorm different ways students can help make a difference. (see examples below)
If I see someone…I can…
playing by themselvesinvite them to play
eating alonesit with them 
cryingask them if they are okay
carrying something heavyask if they need help
with no snackshare my snack with them
  
  
  • Pass out “I Can Make a Difference” chart.  Tell the students they can “borrow” one or two ideas from your chart, but to try to come up with the rest on their own.
  • After students have completed their page, invite them to share their ideas. Discuss setting a goal and challenge each student to pay attention to those around them in school, at home, or in their neighbourhood. Encourage them to notice a need and do their best to take action and “make a difference”.

Download the “I Can Make a Difference” page HERE

Download the “I Can Make a Difference” page for Early Primary page HERE

Join author Linda Grace Smith next Tuesday, May 25th at 9:30 am PST  for a Virtual Author Visit! 

Sign up for FREE Here

Lesson Extension

This lesson would be a great introduction to the concept of “Change Agents”.  Depending on your grade, you could continue sharing books about real people whose actions changed the world.  For more lessons on Change Agents and other global issues, see my book Powerful Understanding – Chapter 4 – Understanding the World

Additional Anchor Books:

The following books are recommended for introducing social injustices, local and global poverty, and acts of kindness that make a difference. Don’t forget to search for Read Alouds on YouTube, if you are teaching online. Whenever possible, choose the video of the actual author reading their own book.

Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed – Emily Pearson

Lend a Hand John Frank

Four Feet, Two Sandals – Karen Lynn Williams

Maddi’s Fridge – Lois Brandt

Each Kindness – Jacqueline Woodson

Those Shoes – Maribeth Boelts

I Like, I Don't Like: Baccelliere, Anna, Ale + Ale: 9780802854803: Books -  Amazon.ca

I Like, I Don’t Like – Anna Baccelliere

Some Tips for a Better World and Happier Life – Rebecca Doughty

Secret Kindness Agents: How Small Acts of Kindness Really Can Change the World – Ferial Pearson

Weezer Changes the World – David McPhail

What Does It Mean to Be Global? (What Does It Mean To Be...?) by [Rana DiOrio, Chris Hill]

What Does it Mean to Be Global – Dana DiOrio

Recommended books from the Simbi Library. (Not familiar with Simbi-Read for Good? – Check it out HERE)

Bear Shaped by Dawn Coulter-Cruttenden

  Lubna and Pebble by Wendy Meddour

  Lionel the Lonely Monster by Fred Blunt

  Impact Series: Malala Yousafzai by Stephanie vanKampen

  Impact Series: Anne Frank by Stephanie vanKampen

  Impact Series: Greta Thunberg by Adrienne Gear

  A New Alphabet for Humanity by Leesa McGregor

  Rebel Girl: Yeonmi Park by Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo

   There’s a Norseman in the Classroom by Grayson Smith

Thanks for stopping by! Hope you have some new ideas and new book titles to inspire small acts that make a big difference!

Somewhere inside all of us, is the power to change the world – Roald Dahl

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Filed under Class Community Building, Lesson Ideas, OLLI, Online Books and Lessons, social justice, Social Responsibility

Adrienne’s OLLI – Online Learning Lesson Idea #16 – Leaving Our Heartprints

I originally created OLLIs when schools in my province of British Columbia shut down last spring due to Covid19.  While we are now back in class, I know there are many districts still juggling virtual and in-class support.  These OLLIs can be used both in class and virtually person.  Either way, I hope you find some ideas that you can use with your students to lighten your load just a little this year!  

Here is a list of the previous OLLI lessons and anchor books in case you missed any of them:

OLLI#1 (The Hike)

OLLI#2. (If I Could Build A School)

OLLIE#3  (Mother’s Day)

OLLI#4 (Everybody Needs a Rock)

OLLI #5(WANTED:  Criminals of the Animal Kingdom) 

OLLI #6 – (Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt)

OLLI #7 (All About Feelings – “Keep it! – Calm it! – Courage it!)  

OLLI #8 (I’m Talking DAD! – lesson for Father’s Day) 

OLLI #9 (Be Happy Right Now!) 

OLLI #10 – (Dusk Explorers)

OLLI#11 (If You Come to Earth)

OLLI #12 (Map of Good Memories)

OLLI #13 (Harvey Slumfenburger)

OLLI #14 (New Year’s Resolutions)

OLLI #15 ( 100 Things That Make Me Happy)

THE INSPIRATION:

As we turn a page on a new month and start to prepare for Valentine’s Day, most of us will be talking to our students about kindness.  Why not use this month to inspire a little heartprinting in your class!  This lesson comes directly from my book Powerful Understanding (Understanding Others – page 101-103, 121), but in case you don’t have a copy, here it is!  

THE ANCHOR (Primary) 

A World of Kindness – Anne Featherstone

This simple book outlines clear, concrete examples of different ways you can be kind.  From waiting your turn, to helping someone younger – this book is a great starting point for discussing “actions of kindness” that leave heartprints on others.   You can find the online read aloud – HERE 

Note:  The read aloud narrator on Youtube starts by greeting “grade 1’s” so you may wish to just start the video a few seconds in if you don’t teach grade one!  

The Anchor – Intermediate

Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed – Emily Pearson

One of my very favorite anchor books for introducing random acts of kindness and discussing how an ordinary deed can change the world.  While it looks like it would be more geared for younger readers, the message is for everyone!  A wonderful story about the ripple effect that kindness can have and a bonus math lesson on expediential growth at the end!  

You can watch a video of the read-aloud HERE  

The Lesson

  • Begin with the “one word” activity.  Write the word “Kindness” on the board or chart stand.  Invite students to think about a connection, a visual image, and a feeling connected to that word.  Have students share their ideas with a partner and then brainstorm out.
  • Create a class web, recording their ideas around the word using one color of pen.  Tell the students you are going to come back to this web at the end of the lesson to see if our thinking has stretched.  
  • Show a photo of a footprint in sand.  Ask the students what it is and how it’s made.  Show a picture of a handprint and ask the same thing.
  • Write the word “heartprint” on the board.  Ask students what they think it might be – discuss in partners and with the class. 
  • Explain that a heartprint, like a footprint or handprint is something that you leave behind.  But unlike a footprint or handprint, you can’t actually see it.  But you do feel it inside your heart.  
  • Ask students how someone might leave behind a heartprint.  Invite students to share some ideas.  Discuss that leaving heartprint is often done quietly, without being asked.  Depending on your grade, you can introduce the concept of “random acts of kindness”.  
  • Share the anchor book A World of Kindness.  Invite students to listen for ways to be kind and leave heartprints.  
  • After the story, discuss examples of kindness from the story.  Discuss how the acts were sometimes very simple.   Leaving a heartprint doesn’t have to be big or involve “buying someone a present”.  It could be as simple as letting someone go first, or giving someone a compliment.  
  • Revisit the One Word activity “kindness” on the board and invite students to reflect on the word.  How has our thinking about this word changed or stretched?  Invite students to share and record new ideas, using a different color felt, to show the change in thinking.
  • Explain that this month is Family Day and Valentines Day – both days give us opportunities to leave heartprints at home and at school
  • Create a T-chart and brainstorm ways they can leave heartprints at home (clean up my room, take out the garbage without being asked, thank mother or father for cooking the supper, do a chore in secret, share a toy with your brother or sister) and at school (leave a positive message on a sticky note on someone’s desk, clean out someone’s desk, hold the door for someone, let someone go infront of you) 
  • Plan a Heartprint Week in your class next week.  Invite students to come up with ways they will leave heartprints for others.  
  • Pass out the template “Leaving My Heartprint” for students to complete.  They set their goals at the top and then complete the bottom at the end of the week.  

         Download the template HERE

Additional books about spreading kindness: 

Here are some additional books about kindness you can share throughout your Heartprint Week.  I’ve tried to include options for both primary and intermediate ages.   If you don’t have a physical copy of the book, many are available as online read-alouds.  Just google the title and search “video”.    One important theme I would try to include is how one person’s small act kindness can make a huge difference to many.  Don’t forget to revisit the word “kindness” and add new thinking to the One Word Activity after you read.

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What Does it Mean to Be Kind? – Rana DiOrio

When We Are Kind – Monique Gray Smith

Lend a Hand – Poems About Giving – John Frank

The Can Man – Laura E. Williams

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The Jelly Donut Difference – Maria Demondy

Somebody Loves You, Mr. Hatch – Eileen Spinelli

How Kind! – Mary Murphy

The Pink Umbrella – Amelia Callot

The Love Letter – Anika Aldamay Denise 

Plant a Kiss – Amy Krouse Rosenthal

The Mitten Tree – Candace Christiansen

 Be Kind – Pat Zietlow Miller

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The Kindness Quilt – Nancy Elizabeth Wallace

Tomorrow I’ll l Be Kind – Jessica Hische

The Day it Rained Hearts – Felicia Bond

Share Some Kindness, Bring Some Light – Apryl Stott

Thanks for stopping by!  Happy Heartprinting, everyone! 

 

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Filed under Kindness, New Books, OLLI, Online Books and Lessons, Social Responsibility, Valentine's Day