Tag Archives: Joseph Bruchac

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? Books to Celebrate the Moon!

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It’s Monday and I’m happy to be participating in a weekly event with a community of bloggers who post reviews of books that they have read the previous week. Check out more IMWAYR posts here: Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers

With the “Super Blood Wolf Moon” and lunar eclipse tonight, I thought it would be a great time to feature a few of my favorite moon books!

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Taan’s Moons – Alison Gear

Starting with my sister’s book – Taan’s Moons – of course!  A beautiful collaborative story written by my sister, Alison, and a group of kindergarten children from Haida Gwaii.  Gorgeous felted illustrations by Kiki van der Heiden.  This book is about cycles – of moons, of seasons, of bears, of life.  I may be a little biased, (since I know the author so well!) but this is a beautiful book.

When the Moon is Full – Penny Pollock

Most of us have heard of September’s Harvest Moon, but did you know that January’s full moon is called the Wolf Moon, because Native Americans believed that wolves become restless in January? March is the Sap Moon, because its warm days and cold nights cause the syrup to run in the maples.  This beautifully illustrated collection of poetry follows the monthly path of the moon with traditional Native American names for each month. Gorgeous hand-colored woodcuts by Mary Azarian.  There is also a question and answer section in the back of the book. A great book could be used with primary grade children when studying the phases of the moon and to pair with Taan’s Moons to compare how different indigenous people view and name the moons.

Thirteen Moons on Turtle’s Back – A Native American Year of Moons Joseph Bruchac

In Native American legend, the thirteen scales on Old Turtle’s back hold the key to the thirteen cycles of the moon and the changing seasons.  In this story, a grandfather tells the story of the thirteen moons to his grandson. Each moon story has been chosen from each of the thirteen Native American tribal nations in different regions of the United States and each gives the reader a true sense of the the belief of Native American to notice the world around them.

Moon:  A Peek-Through Picture Book Britta Teekentrup

Such a clever way to learn about the day to day changes of the moon.  In this brand new picture book, readers will learn the lunar cycle through clever peek-through holes, each revealing the moon in a different size and shape.  SO beautiful!

A Big Mooncake for Little Star  Grace Lin

Such a gorgeous book!  A young child bakes a Mooncake with her mom. She’s told not allowed to eat it, but, she does nibble on it a little bit everyday.   A unique and intriguing way to explain the phases of the moon.  Simple black and yellow illustrations evokes a soothing feeling of nighttime.  Love Little Star’s and her mother’s black pajamas with big yellow stars on!  Don’t forget to check out the end papers!

 The Boy and the Blue Moon – Sara O’Leary

Shhhhhh….. there is magic between these pages.  Start with a little boy and a cat on a nighttime adventure…Sprinkle a little touch of Where the Wild Things AreOwl Moon, and The Little Prince... weave together some facts about phases of the moon, the solar system and dreams.  Oh… and don’t forget some spectacular illustrations.  What can I say?  Sara O’Leary (A Family is a Family is a Family, This is Sadie) continues to create these whimsical, magical books that beg to be shared.  And this one just might be my favorite.

When the Moon Comes Paul Harbridge

The author shares his own childhood memories of playing pond hockey on frozen backyard rinks.  Whether you are a hockey fan or not, this book celebrates a sense of adventure and the magic of time spent outdoors.  Gorgeous figurative language makes this a wonderful anchor book for descriptive writing and capturing small moments.  The illustrations are stunning.

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Owl Moon – Jane Yolen

This classic book about a young girl and her dad going owling one night by the light of a winter moon is one of my go-to books.   I use this book so often when I am teaching descriptive writing and using the senses.  Jane Yolen’s  quiet, poetic language never gets old.

Moon Alison Oliver

While not really about the moon, this one is well worth reading!  A young girl who is overwhelmed by her daily “To Do” checklist learns how to embrace her inner wild child after meeting a wolfy friend one night.  A great message for us all to take a step back from the hustle and bustle of our lives,  get out, and enjoy play time in nature.  The illustrations are beautiful, with lovely hues of “night” colors and great expressions.

Night of the Moon: A Muslim Holiday Story – Hena Khan

I learned a lot about the traditions and celebrations of Ramadan.   This book centers around a young girl named Yasmeen and her family during Ramadan.  It starts by intruding the importance of the moon and how the new moon meant a new month in the Islamic calendar.  The book explains about what a traditional Ramadan is like including fasting, parties, prayer delicious foods, and presents.  Great authors notes at the back.  This would make a perfect anchor for learning about different cultural celebrations.

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The Moon Inside Sandra V. Feder

This beautiful picture book is about a girl who confronts her fears and therefore gains a new friend, the moon. The mixed media illustrations make the moon come alive- and the reader is drawn to the yellow which is as comforting for us as it is for Ella.

Kitten’s First Full Moon – Kevin Henkes

Simple, sweet story with Caldecott-winning cuddly charcoal style artwork by the great Kevin Henkes.  A kitten mistakes a full moon for a bowl of milk and the ensuing adventure is full of mistakes and disappointments but a welcome treat is waiting for her at the end of it all!

The Moon Book – Gail Gibbons

I love the simplicity of Gail Gibbons’ introductory science books.  Packed with fascinating facts about the moon but presented in an accessible, easy to read format with her signature colorful illustrations.

Dear Sun, Dear Moon – Deborah Paggi

A delightful collection of letters between the sun and the moon, each singing one another’s praises.  The sun is praised for starting each day by waking all forms of life, both animal and plant, while the moon is praised for the brilliance of its glow at night, enabling animals to see and forage for food and seek shelter.  I LOVE this book so much and will definitely be using it for a writing lesson on voice and personification.

Moon Wishes – Guy and Patricia Storms

If you were the moon, what would you do? This whimsically illustrated and lyrical picture book from Guy & Patricia Storms answers this question with things such as “…wax and wane over the Earth’s troubles,” and “…be a beacon for the lost and lonely.”  I loved the language in this brand new book by Groundwood (released next month) and a will be a perfect anchor book for writing.

What’s your favorite moon book?

Thanks for stopping by!

 

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Filed under Moons, New Books

Diversity Saturday- Food Around the World!

I’m excited to be participating in Diverse Children’s Books, celebrating diversity in children’s literature hosted by Katie @ The Logonauts;  Myra @ Gathering Books, Mia @ Pragmatic Mom, Crystal @ Reading Through Life and co-blogger @ Rich in Color and Carrie @ There’s a Book for That.   If you have your own diverse children’s books you’d like to share, head over to Katie’s blog to link up.

Today I am celebrating diversity through picture books about FOOD – a delicious way to learn about different cultures!  Many of the students in my school come from diverse backgrounds, so these books are excellent anchors for making connections, a starting point for a inquiry unit on food and cultures around the world, or creating a multicultural cook book filled with recipes and stories.

Hot, Hot Roti for Dada-ji – F. Zia  (India)

A lively, lovely story about grandparents visiting from India.  Many cultural traditions are shared through the grandfather’s stories, great illustrations and playful tone.  This is a perfect connect book for my students!

What Shall I Make? – Nandini Nayar  (India)

Sweet imaginative story originally published in India.  Neeraj’s mother gives him some chapati dough to play with while she cooks. “What should I make?” he wonders? His little ball of dough morphs into a snake, a mouse, a cat, and a lion, until finally – a big round chapati hot and puffy from cooking on the tavawho.

Bee-bim Bop! Linda Sue Park  (Korea)

This lively rhyming book follows a young girl as she and her mom make a traditional Korean dish called Bee-bim bop, which translates to “mixed-up rice.”  From the grocery store to the kitchen, this book shows diverse characters, foods and language. A wonderful recipe is included that even has parts for a child and parts for the grown up. Love the language in this one.

Duck for Turkey Day – Jacqueline Jules (Vietnam)

Excellent book for explaining diversity and inclusion as a young girl worries that her family is having duck on Thanksgiving instead of the traditional turkey.   A great message that no matter how you celebrate or what you eat, it’s the gathering of family that is important.  This would make a perfect book for making connections for my students.

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Dumpling Soup  – Jama Kim Rattigan (Hawaii)

Marisa gets to help make dumplings this year to celebrate the New Year.  Set in the Hawaiian islands, this story celebrates the joyful mix of food, customs, and languages from many cultures representing the diversity that is Hawaii;  Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Hawaiian, and haole (Hawaiian for white people, according to the book:)

Dim Sum for Everyone!– Grace Lin  (Asian-American)

Wonderful, simple story that follows a family sharing the many small  dishes in a traditional dim-sum restaurant.  I enjoyed the explanation of some of the dishes as well as the history of this Asian tradition.  A perfect connect book!

Too Many Tamales – Gary Soto (Mexico)

A touching story of a young girl named Maria who loses her mother’s wedding ring as she makes traditional tamales for a holiday celebration during the Christmas season. Problem solving, family support and culture all woven together.

What Can You Do with a Paleta? – Carmen Tafolla   (Mexico)

Children will make many connections to the ice cream truck when reading this book about a young girl who is waiting for the “Paleta truck” to arrive in her neighbourhood one hot summer day.  I love the colorful, lively illustrations in this book and the writing that focuses on the many senses of the “bario” (neighbourhood).  This would be an excellent anchor book for writing about place and using your senses.

Cora Cooks Pancit – Dorina K. Lazo Gilmore (Philippines)

This story is about a young Filipino-American girl, named Cora, who finally gets the chance go help her mother cook her favorite Filipino Dish,  Pancit.   I enjoyed how both the process of cooking and the heritage of the dish are woven through the mother’s stories while they are cooking.  Beautiful illustrations and recipes included!

The First Strawberries A CHEROKEE STORY – Joseph Bruchac

Traditional Cherokee legend which tells the story of how the first strawberries came to be.  Respect, kindness, relationships and nature are all themes included in this book.  Gorgeous illustrations.

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Eat, Leo, Eat! – Caroline Adderson  (Italy)

When Leo doesn’t want to eat Nonna’s lunches she comes up with an intriguing tale for each dish. The pages of this book are filled with vivid illustrations, tradition, and the love of food and family.  I loved the additional glossary of Italian words and the spread about pasta names with their Italian origins.

Mama Panya’s Pancakes: A Village Tale from Kenya Mary and Rich Chamberlin (Kenya)

When a young boy and his mother go to market to buy ingredients for her famous pancakes, he generously invites the whole village to join them!  Now Mama is worried they won’t have enough to go around.  Wow… this touching book contains so many themes besides food, it’s hard to list them all:  sharing, generosity, hunger, culture, community, Kenya, market.  An important book about sharing what little resources you have.

Latkes, Latkes, Good to Eat! A Chanukah Story – Naomi Howard

Wonderful story celebrating Chanukah with a Russian Jewish version of the magic cooking pot. Would be great to pair with Strega Nona and the Magic Porridge Pot.  Colorful, expressive illustrations similar to Patricia Polacco.

Hiromi’s Hands – Lynne Barasch  (Japanese-American)

The true story of Hiromi Suzuki, a Japanese American girl who defied tradition to train at her family s restaurant, and became one of the first female sushi chefs in New York.  Great introduction to sushi and would be a great segue into a discussion about immigration with older students.

Everybody Cooks Rice – Norah Dooley    (Multicultural)

A young girl discovers a multitude of different traditional rice dishes in her neighbourhood from all different countries.   This book is from a series which includes Everybody Brings Noodles and Everybody Serves Soup.  It would be a great launch for an inquiry into the history and uses of rice around the world.

No More Beige Food – Leanne Shirtliffe (multicultural)

When Wilma Lee looks at her boring plate of beige food she decides it’s time to take action. She visits her neighbors where she learns how to cook colorful food from Thailand, Mexico, Lebanon, and Paris. Told in rhyme with vivid illustration this fun book is perfect for discussing diversity and trying new dishes.

Hungry yet?  Hopefully hungry for some of these delicious picture books to share with your students and celebrate diversity through food!  What are your favorite food books?

THANKS FOR STOPPING BY!

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Filed under Diverse Children's Books, Food, making connections